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Sekhmet from Egyptian Mythology (Goddess of War and destruction, and healing) as drawn by Claire Hummel (shoomlah on Deviantart). This was for a remake/remodel on the Warren Ellis forum. "The idea for this particular challenge was to do a modern day version of Sekhmet, as she might appear in comics."

Etsyfrom Etsy

Anubis Egyptian God Print

Anubis

In Aztec mythology, Tepeyollotl ("heart of the mountains"; also Tepeyollotli) was the god of earthquakes, echoes and jaguars. He is the god of the Eighth Hour of the Night, and is depicted as a jaguar leaping towards the sun. He may be the same as Mictlantecutli, Tlaltecuhtli, Teoyaomicqui and Tezcatlipoca. The word is derived as a compound of the Nahuatl words tepētl ("mountain"), and yōllōtl ("heart" or "interior").

Ra is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty he had become a major deity in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the mid-day sun. In later Egyptian dynastic times, Ra was merged with the god Horus. He was associated with the falcon or hawk.

Egyptian Goddess Hathor. She was known as "the Great One of Many Names" and her titles and attributes are so numerous that she was important in every area of the life and death of the ancient Egyptians. She was originally a personification of the Milky Way. As time passed she absorbed the attributes of many other goddesses.

In Egyptian mythology, Sekhmet was originally the warrior goddess as well as goddess of healing for Upper Egypt. She is depicted as a lioness, the fiercest hunter known to the Egyptians. It was said that her breath formed the desert. She was seen as the protector of the pharaohs and led them in warfare.

Art and Designfrom Art and Design

30 Mind-Blowing Examples of Angel Art

Valkyrie In Norse mythology, is one of a host of female figures who decide which soldiers die in battle and which live. Selecting among half of those who die in battle (the other half go to the goddess Freyja's afterlife field Fólkvangr), the valkyries bring their chosen to the afterlife hall of the slain, Valhalla, ruled over by the god Odin. There, the deceased warriors become einherjar. When the einherjar are not preparing for the events of Ragnarök, the valkyries bear them mead.

Gabija (pronounced GA-bee-jah) is the Lithuanian Goddess of Fire and the Hearth. As Gabjauja, she was also Goddess of Corn and other Grains. When a follower laid out a fire or a meal, they would give an offering to Gabija as well—water for a fire, and beer for a meal. Gabija’s fire protected the home from thieves and demons, and could only be put out with pure water. With the advent of Christianity, Gabija was identified with St. Agnes.