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Google Image Result for http://www.saiya-chan-com.nl02.members.pcextreme.nl/_kimono/itchiku_tsujigahana03.png

Google Image Result for http://www.saiya-chan-com.nl02.members.pcextreme.nl/_kimono/itchiku_tsujigahana03.png

Zijden Pracht. Kimono’s uit de Kubota collectie - Tentoonstellingen | SieboldHuis

Zijden Pracht. Kimono’s uit de Kubota collectie - Tentoonstellingen | SieboldHuis

Itchiku Kubota (1917-2003) brought to his work an emotional response to nature that was both deeply personal and uniquely Japanese.

Itchiku Kubota (1917-2003) brought to his work an emotional response to nature that was both deeply personal and uniquely Japanese.

Itchiko Kubota was a master craftsman, creating astonishing pieces like this. Each kimono was made up first out of plain silk then died, inked, knotted, steamed, embroidered and generally painted into a work of fabulous art. When he died he had sixty apprentices, so his genius lives on.

Itchiko Kubota was a master craftsman, creating astonishing pieces like this. Each kimono was made up first out of plain silk then died, inked, knotted, steamed, embroidered and generally painted into a work of fabulous art. When he died he had sixty apprentices, so his genius lives on.

Itchiku Kubota, a Japanese textile artist “famous for reviving and modernizing a lost late-15th- to early-16th-century textile-dyeing and decorating technique called tsujigahana (literally, flowers at the crossroads).”

Itchiku Kubota, a Japanese textile artist “famous for reviving and modernizing a lost late-15th- to early-16th-century textile-dyeing and decorating technique called tsujigahana (literally, flowers at the crossroads).”

Furisode, Late Edo period (1789–1868), 19th century Silk, 4:1 satin damask weave (rinzu); embroidered with silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper-strip-wrapped silk in satin stitches; laid work and couching, and padded couching; lined with silk, plain weave 183.8 x 128.8 cm (72 1/4 x 50 3/4 in.). First the edges of the trunk were padded with a heavy thread; then, over this padding, gold-wrapped thread was couched with red silk thread.The Art Institute of Chicago

Furisode, Late Edo period (1789–1868), 19th century Silk, 4:1 satin damask weave (rinzu); embroidered with silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper-strip-wrapped silk in satin stitches; laid work and couching, and padded couching; lined with silk, plain weave 183.8 x 128.8 cm (72 1/4 x 50 3/4 in.). First the edges of the trunk were padded with a heavy thread; then, over this padding, gold-wrapped thread was couched with red silk thread.The Art Institute of Chicago

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