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1885 Carriage Ensemble, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the Victorian era, riding in an open carriage was considered a social event, so one had to dress appropriately for it. Carriage ensembles had to not only protect against the cold, but they had to look good, as well.

Sarah Elizabeth Galleryfrom Sarah Elizabeth Gallery

MET Museum 18th Century Robe in Pink with Floral Silk French 1750-1799

Find It, Own It, Love It! Interest Free Payment Plans Available 18th Century French Robe in Pale Pink and Floral Striped Silk, French 1750-1799 Museum deaccessioned from the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dress: 1881, American, wool/linen/silk/mother-of-pearl. "The bustle silhouette, although primarily associated with the second half of the 19th century, originated in earlier fashions as a simple bump at the back of the dress, such as with late 17th-early 18th century mantuas and late 18th- early 19th century Empire dresses. The full-blown bustle silhouette had its first Victorian appearance in the late 1860s, which started as fullness in skirts moving to the back of the dress. This fullness…

~French Riding ensemble - c. 1905 - Silk, metal thread, ostrich feathers - Marking: 'Morin Blossier, Paris' and 'Her Majesty Queen Alexandra' - The Metropolitan Museum of Art~