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1885 Carriage Ensemble, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the Victorian era, riding in an open carriage was considered a social event, so one had to dress appropriately for it. Carriage ensembles had to not only protect against the cold, but they had to look good, as well.

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Sarah Elizabeth Galleryfrom Sarah Elizabeth Gallery

Antique Green Shot Silk Quilted Petticoat, Plaid Lining, Underskirt 19th Century

Find It, Own It, Love It! Interest Free Payment Plans Available Antique Green Shot Silk Quilted Petticoat, Plaid Lining, Underskirt 19th Century Exterior in green shot silk with cotton plaid green and

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Visiting Dress Made Of Silk And Cotton, By James McCreary & Co., N.Y. - American c.1889 - The Metropolitan Museum Of Art

Dress, American, 1890. Silk and linen. Metropolitan Museum of Art: "This dress is in keeping with the interest in historical revivals popular in the 19th century. The long puffed sleeves refer to both Elizabethan and early 19th-century styles. The one-piece construction indicates it was probably intended for formal reception at home."

Blue silk taffeta and velvet winter ensemble (front, without velvet jacket with fur trim), French, ca. 1874.

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Fichu Date: late 19th century Culture: Belgian Medium: linen Dimensions: 25 1/2 in. (64.8 cm) Accession Number: 2009.300.3831 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Evening Dress, R. H. White & Company: 1885, American, silk/fathers. The bustle silhouette, although primarily associated with the second half of the 19th century, originated in earlier fashions as a simple bump at the back of the dress, such as with late 17th-early 18th century mantuas and late 18th- early 19th century Empire dresses. The full-blown bustle silhouette had its first Victorian appearance in the late 1860s, which started as fullness in skirts moving to the back of the dress…

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1880 Dress Culture: American The bustle silhouette, although primarily associated with the second half of the 19th century, originated in earlier fashions as a simple bump at the back of the dress, such as with late 17th-early 18th century mantuas and late 18th- early 19th century Empire dresses. The full-blown bustle silhouette had its first Victorian appearance in the late 1860s, which started as fullness in skirts moving to the back of the dress.