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    “An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was actually appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills and was captured in 1864 and ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866.

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    • Jaime Lee Moyer

      ca. 1880’s, [cabinet card of Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor], Collins Studio "An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy.

    • Erica W

      ca. 1880’s, “An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy.

    • Emily Dawkins

      ca. 1880’s, [cabinet card of Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor], Collins Studio. "An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy....Mary Walker remains the only woman recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.”

    • Metal Muse

      Honestly, don't know if she was queer. But I really have a thing for women who fought and served (usually dressed as men) in the Civil War and the Revolutionary War. ca. 1880’s, Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor. Only woman to receive a Congressional Medal of Honor in the Civil War.

    • The Sociological Cinema

      Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor, 1880s. “An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon & spy. Walker was captured in 1864 & ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in Jan. 1866 on the recommendation of Gen. Sherman. Dr. Walker died in 1919.”

    • Bernadette De Joya

      “An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was actually appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills and was captured in 1864 and ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866.

    • Anna Nio

      "An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills. She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866 on the personal recommendation of General Sherman. Mary Walker still remains the only woman recipient of this honor."

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