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“An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was actually appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills and was captured in 1864 and ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866.

Women in the civil war were not allowed unless they were nurses. Four hundred women served in the war. Some historical records show that over sixty women were wounded or killed in the war.

Rare Civil War Photos Wives and children sometimes followed their husbands to war, particularly in the early period of the conflict. “(The soldiers) were in the camp, and the women and the kids were right there.

About.com Educationfrom About.com Education

Learn about Lucy Stone: Abolitionist and Women's Rights Reformer

Lucy Stone. 1st woman in America to keep her last name upon marriage, 1st Massachusets woman to graduate college, chopped her hair off, scandalously wore precursors to pants, was kicked out of church for arguing that women had the right to own property and to be able to divorce abusive alcoholic husbands (the nerve).

Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson was a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and one of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee

Elizabeth Blackwell was rejected by 19+ medical schools but was finally accepted by Geneva Medical College in NY. She graduated on January 23, 1849 to become the first female doctor in history.

Death mask of Mary Queen of Scots. She was very beautiful and it is said that Queen Elizabeth was jealous of her beauty.

Mary Edwards Walker in her later years, 1911. She received the Medal of Honor for her work as a surgeon during the US Civil War, the only woman to ever get one. In 1917 the Army tightened up the rules for what you had to do/be to get the MoH...and deleted 911 names from the Medal of Honor Roll, including hers. She kept her medal and wore it till her death. Jimmy Carter restored her medal posthumously.

Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte (1865-1915) Dr. Picotte was the first American Indian woman in the United States to receive a medical degree, graduating at the top of her class at the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1889. After her internship, she returned to the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska to care for more than 1,200 of her own native people at the government boarding school. She opened a hospital in the reservation town of Walthill, Nebraska in 1913, two years before her death.

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker was the first woman awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, for her work as a surgeon during the Civil War.

Lydia Litvyak. One of two Russian pilots who were the world’s only female fighting aces during World War II. She kicked Nazi butt.

Cathay Williams a house slave until her late teens but her Master died @ the time the Civil War broke out. She got out and took a job as a paid servant cooklng/laundry for soldiers while observing them and learning all sorts of things about Military Life that women @ that time were far from privy to. While this was happening the Legislation authorized 6 all black unit in the U.S Army With her knowledge she cut her hair off and changed her name to William Cathay to join Buffalo Soldiers as a…

Mary and Molly (or "Mollie") Bell were two young women from Pulaski County, Virginia[ who disguised themselves as men and fought in the Civil War for the Confederacy for two years.

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

The women who fought as men: Rare Civil War pictures of female soldiers who dressed up as males to fight

The women who fought as men: Rare American Civil War pictures show how females disguised themselves so they could go into battle

Civil War Veteran Jacob Miller of the 9th Indiana Infantry was shot in the forehead on Sept.19th 1863 at Brock Field at Chickamauga. He survived the shot, later writing that he had a constant reminder of the Chickamauga Battlefield and the constant pain he suffered from that wound.