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  • Anya Milano

    Edible flower pin page- Queen Anne's Lace, also called "Wild Carrot," is a common plant in dry fields, ditches, and open areas. It was introduced from Europe, and the carrots that we eat today were once cultivated from this plant. Queen Anne's Lace grows up to four feet tall. Its leaves are two to eight inches long and fern-like. This plant is best known for its flowers, which are tiny and white, blooming in lacy, flat-topped clusters. Each little flower has a dark, purplish center.

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Daucus carota by horticultural art. Fred has some very interesting photo compositions in his Flickr gallery.

Daucus carota - Queen Anne's Lace - Use as filler for a lacy, 'transparent' effect in the garden bed with verbena bonariensis, lavender, salvia, lambs ears, etc, the mediterranean garden.

This Ivy House - obxsweetheart: (via Tumblr Archive Poster)

I have always loved Queen Anne's Lace. When I was little my grandmother would pick some and add food coloring to the water so the flower heads took on the color of the water. Special memories for me.

Queen Annes Lace......... beautiful

Queen Anne's Lace - if you put these flowers in water & food coloring, the flowers will turn the color of the food coloring.

Queen Anne's Lace grew in abundance, and we happily collected them for fancy parasols for our dolls and Barbies.

Daucus carota; common names include wild carrot, (UK) bird's nest, bishop's lace, and Queen Anne's lace (North America), a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae.

sweetruffles: Wild carrot (Queen Anne's Lace) (via Pretty Things)

Another great center piece. You could even just lean a number next to it and make them you table numbers. Use different vessels to add charm. Check out more ideas from the tea, and follow us on Facebook. Vintage Emporium Rentals.