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    Manila during February 8-12, 1945. U.S. Army Nurses from Bataan and Corregidor, freed after three years imprisonment in Santo Tomas Interment Compound, climb into trucks as they leave Manila, Luzon, P.I., on their way home to the U.S. The nurses are wearing new uniforms given to them to replace their worn out clothes. [12 February 1945]

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    • ELizabeth McNeil

      Former Army Nurse Corps POWs from Bataan and Corregidor, freed after three years imprisonment in Santo Tomas Internment Camp in the Philippines, and on their way home wearing new uniforms, February 1945.

    • Janet

      "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor": Army nurses, wearing new uniforms, crowd into a truck following their February 1945 liberation from the Santo Tomas Internment Compound in Manila.

    • Sarah Bardsley

      Manila during February 8-12, 1945. U.S. Army Nurses from Bataan and Corregidor, freed after three years imprisonment in Santo Tomas Interment Compound, climb into trucks as they leave Manila, Luzon, P.I., on their way home to the U.S. The nurses are wearing new uniforms given to them to replace their worn out clothes. [12 February 1945]

    • M M

      US Army nurses, liberated from Japanese captivity in Santo Tomas, Philippines after three years of incarceration,en route to the airfield for the beginning of their trip back home. February 1945.

    • Vikki Prudden

      Some of the Angels of Bataan being evacuated after the liberation of the internment camp at Santo Tomas.

    • Peer Into The Past: History

      Almost 100 nurses, without combat training, refused to leave their patients behind and found themselves behind enemy lines. They survived months in the jungle, the infamous Bataan Death March, and 3 year's in a POW camp. Army nurses rescued from Santo Tomas 1945

    • Pentax

      Euphoric U.S. Army nurses are seen en route to the airfield for the beginning of their trip back home after liberation from captivity in Santo Tomas, the Philippines, in 1945. In April 1942, with the Japanese army less than two miles away, they defied orders to evacuate and chose to stay with the Filipino nurses to tend to the wounded on Bataan and then Corregidor.

    • Allison A.Couturier

      POW nurses (1945) The dangers faced by military nurses serving overseas were quickly realized within months of the United States entering the war. In the spring of 1942 dozens of American nurses became Japanese prisoners of war as Bataan and Corregidor fell in the Philippines. Though they remained POWs under horrific conditions for three years and suffered their own injuries and illnesses, they continued to care for soldiers in the camp until they were freed in February 1945. In November 1942, 60 unarmed Army nurses found themselves in the thick of combat with troops on beaches during the invasion of North Africa. It was the Allies first amphibious landing in the Mediterranean, and they had expected minimal resistance. Loaded with full packs and wearing helmets, the nurses ducked from sniper fire as they waded to the shore from assault boats. The service and heroism of all the women who served in the Army and Navy Nurse Corps was finally recognized in 1947 when the temporary officer status granted to them during the war was made permanent.

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