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Marie Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952) was a Chippewa attorney. Marie was the first Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law. Today the Women’s Law Association at her alma mater funds a scholarship in her name. Following law school, Marie worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and was treasurer the Society of American Indians.

Susan B Anthony pummeled and arrested for attempting to vote in 1872. She was fined 100 dollars for registering to vote.

BOOTH'S KILLER WAS MAD AS A HATTER: Boston Corbett, the Union Sergeant who shot and killed John Wilkes Booth, led a colorful and increasingly bizarre life. After his wife died in 1858, he castrated himself to avoid temptations of the flesh. He shot Booth against orders, stating "Providence guided my hand". After the war he returned to being a hatter, and his life spiraled downard. After being sent to an asylum in 1888, he escaped to live in a cabin in the woods, where he disappeared.

Wartime toys were extremely popular during World War II. Here, Patsy Ann McHugh, as a nurse, bandages the hand of “wounded aviator” Bobby O’Connor with her nursing kit in New York.

Interesting fact: Lincoln was shot at, in 1863, Lincoln rode alone to the Soldiers’ Home. A shot rang out and a bareheaded Lincoln came back to the compound clinging to his steed. Lincoln explained that a gunshot had gone off at the foot of the hill, sending the horse galloping so fast it knocked his hat off. Two soldiers retrieved Lincoln’s hat, which had a bullet hole right through it. The president asked the guards to keep the incident under wraps: He didn’t want to worry his wife Mary

The immediate reaction of German POWs upon being forced by the US Army to watch to the uncensored footage of the concentration camps shot by the US Signal Corps ~ it's shots like this that make me believe many didn't know anything beyond the fact that they were fighting for freedom (in their view)

Edmund Ruffin (January 5, 1794 – June 17, 1865) was a farmer and slaveholder, a Confederate soldier, and an 1850s political activist. He advocated states' rights, secession, and slavery and was described by opponents as one of the Fire-Eaters. He was an ardent supporter of the Confederacy and a longstanding enemy of the North.Because the widely held belief that he fired the first shot of the Battle of Fort Sumter, Ruffin is credited as "firing the first shot of the Civil War."