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A lovely family vacation...in Egypt during the Arab Spring revolution of 2011.

Catherine Ann Silva, who volunteered 4 1/2 months at the Edna Adan Maternity Hospital, brings her family to meet Edna, "the woman who changed my life," when Edna visits the Los Angeles Skirball Institute Half The Sky Exhibit.

Announcing Win-a-Trip 2012

Win-A-Tip with Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times. He does this every year in Spring/Summer. Humanitarian trip. Apply!!! www.youtube.com/NicholasKristof

Achille (age 12) sits in Koaro Village, near the Liberian border. He and his family fled to Liberia to escape the violence that erupted after the November 2010 presidential election. They returned to find their home had been damaged and looted. “They took everything,” Achille said. “They stole all my books.” - Côte d’Ivoire, 2011 ©UNICEF/ Olivier Asselin - http://www.unicef.org/photography

An Intimate Conversation with CNN Hero Somaly Mam

Somaly Mam is the founder of the Somaly Mam Foundation which works to end sex trafficking and help former sex slaves regain their lives. She is a former child slave from Cambodia who is now known as a Visionary and Hero worldwide.

Marie Colvin: They’re killing with impunity here. I need to be at the epicentre of the storm — War reporting legend on why she went to Syria, where she was killed. http://journalists.net/article/219/marie-colvin-on-why-she-went-to-syria-where-she-was-killed

Lucy Mashua comes from South Kenya, from a Maasai family. Today, the 30-years old woman lives in Dallas where, after a long Odysse, she found a new home. At age of nine, she became a victim of female genital mutilation, at age of twelve, she was sold! Now a global ambassador fighting FGM.

A selfie with one of my heroes, Dr. Denis Mukwege, at the Harvard commencement as he receives an honorary degree for his heroic work on behalf of women in Congo.

In August 2009, Shining Hope for Communities founded The Kibera School for Girls, the first tuition-free school for girls in Kibera. By providing a superior education, daily nourishment, uniforms, and schools supplies all free of charge, they were able to give the brightest and most at-risk girls the power of hope and education.