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The Tărtăria tablets are three tablets, discovered in 1961 by archaeologist Nicolae Vlassa at a Neolithic site in the village of Tartaria (about 30 km (19 mi) from Alba Iulia in Romania. The tablets, dated to around 5300 BC, bear incised symbols - the Vinca symblods and have been the subject of considerable controversy among archaeologists, some of whom claim that the symbols represent the earliest known form of writing in the world.

muirgilsdream: “ The Tărtăria tablets are three tablets, discovered in 1961 by archaeologist Nicolae Vlassa at a Neolithic site in the village of Tartaria (about 30 km mi) from Alba Iulia in.

Tartaria Tablets  Found in Romania, dated at around 5500 BC    Archaeologists disagree on the origins  Some claim they represent the earliest form of writing  others dispute the claim

The Tărtăria tablets (below) refers to a group of three tablets, discovered in 1961 by archaeologist Nicolae Vlassa at a Neolithic site in the village of Tărtăria (about 30 km mi) from Alba Iulia), in Romania.

Early Sumerian pictographic tablet, c. 3100 BCE. This archaic pictographic script contained the seeds for the development of writing.

Early Sumerian pictographic tablet, c. This archaic pictographic script contained the seeds for the development of writing.

Tarpesti Thinker cucuteni trypillian culture Romania neolithic

Tarpesti Thinker cucuteni trypillian culture Romania neolithic

Cucuteni-Trypillian culture statue Gânditorul din Târpești (The Thinker of Tarpesti) -> similar to Ganditorul de la Hamangia (The Thinker of Hamangia) - and both date back roughly to the same time.

Altar-goddess, bench-like altar with anthropomorphic figure facing a receptacle or cult vessel. Terracotta From Fafos I site, Vinča, Kosovo. Neolithic, Vinča-Plocnik Culture (5th mill. BCE).

BCE Altar-goddess, bench-like altar with anthropomorphic figure facing a receptacle or cult vessel. Terracotta From Fafos I site, Vinca, Kosovo.

10th C. BCE. A tablet of soft limestone inscribed in a paleo-Hebrew script, the Gezer Calendar is one of the oldest known examples of Hebrew writing, dating. It reads:  "Two months of harvest/Two months of planting/Two months of late planting/One month of hoeing/One month of barley-harvest/One month of harvest and festival/Two months of grape harvesting/One month of summer fruit."

The Gezer Calendar, C. A tablet of soft limestone inscribed in a paleo-Hebrew script. It reads: "Two months of harvest/Two months of planting/Two months of late planting/One month of hoeing/One month of barley-harvest/One month of harvest and f

The VINČA SYMBOLS are an Old European script on Neolithic era artifacts from the Vinča culture of southeastern Europe in the 6th to 5th millennia BCE. The symbols are mostly considered as constituting an instance of "proto-writing"; that is, they probably conveyed a message but did not encode language, predating the development of writing proper by more than a millennium.

Vinča Symbols - considered as constituting the oldest excavated example of "proto-writing" in the world, to millennia BCE, modern-day Romania and Eastern Europe

Ancient tablets, South Bulgaria written in the oldest European script, nearly 7,000 years old, and bear the ancient script of the Cretan (Minoan) civilization, known as Linear A script, which dates back to XV-XIV century B.C..

Ancient tablets, South Bulgaria bear the ancient linear A script of the Cretan (Minoan) civilization, which dates back to XV-XIV century B.

Neolithic cat head -- terracotta - c. 4000 BC.  The Vinča culture (c. 6000 to 3000 BC) takes its name from the city of Vinča, near Belgrade, in Serbia, where archaeologists unearthed important remains in 1908. The Vinča people were concentrated near the Danube, in what is now Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Macedonia, but left traces throughout the Balkans.

Cat head -- terracotta - c. Vinča culture (c. 6000 to 3000 BC) is a Neolithic and prehistoric culture takes its name from the city of Vinča, near Belgrade, in Serbia, where archaeologists unearthed important remains in

editing greeks from history: Mycenaean origin of Phoenician alphabet

Tărtăria Tablets 5300 BC -One thing is sure: the writing found on the “Tărtăria tablets” is the first writing in the world, which we know of. Unfortunately, the signs have remained indecipherable until this day.

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