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Rameses became the third king of the 19th Dynasty at the age of 25.    His reign is best known for the buildings he commissioned. Early in his reign, he constructed a new capital, Piramesse, in the Nile delta. He built the rock temples of Abu Simbel and his own mortuary temple at Thebes. The tomb of his principal wife Nefertari, also at Thebes, is one of the best-preserved royal tombs

Rameses became the third king of the 19th Dynasty at the age of 25. His reign is best known for the buildings he commissioned. Early in his reign, he constructed a new capital, Piramesse, in the Nile delta. He built the rock temples of Abu Simbel and his own mortuary temple at Thebes. The tomb of his principal wife Nefertari, also at Thebes, is one of the best-preserved royal tombs

A Forgotten Heroine: Civil rights activist Daisy Bates fought to dismantle Arkansas’ segregation laws.

A Forgotten Heroine: Civil rights activist Daisy Bates fought to dismantle Arkansas’ segregation laws.

Wally Amos was born on July 1, 1936, in Tallahassee, Florida. He started in the mailroom of the William Morris Agency and in 1962 became the first black talent agent in their history. As an agent, he signed Simon & Garfunkel and headed the agency's rock 'n' roll department. In 1975, he opened the first Famous Amos store. In 1998, Keebler purchased the brand, keeping Amos as the spokesperson.

Wally Amos was born on July 1, 1936, in Tallahassee, Florida. He started in the mailroom of the William Morris Agency and in 1962 became the first black talent agent in their history. As an agent, he signed Simon & Garfunkel and headed the agency's rock 'n' roll department. In 1975, he opened the first Famous Amos store. In 1998, Keebler purchased the brand, keeping Amos as the spokesperson.

Coretta Scott King, Yolanda Denise King, and Martin Luther King, Jr. stand on the stairs of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in spring of 1956.

Coretta Scott King, Yolanda Denise King, and Martin Luther King, Jr. stand on the stairs of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in spring of 1956.

In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

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