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Rameses became the third king of the 19th Dynasty at the age of 25. His reign is best known for the buildings he commissioned. Early in his reign, he constructed a new capital, Piramesse, in the Nile delta. He built the rock temples of Abu Simbel and his own mortuary temple at Thebes. The tomb of his principal wife Nefertari, also at Thebes, is one of the best-preserved royal tombs

Aunt Jemim Pancakes, 1930

MARIB. Ancient writing on stone in the Bilqis Temple ruins in the Saba Valley. One of the most famous archaeological sites in Yemen, it was once the capital of the Kingdom of Saba (Sheba).

Idi Amin Dada was born in 1925 in the Koboko district of Northern Uganda. Amin was the Ugandan military dictator and President from 1971 to 1979. During his reign Amin’s military forces are estimated to have killed 500,000 people and exiled roughly 70,000 non-Ugandan nationals (mostly Asians) from Uganda.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King on the five-day march to Montgomery, Alabama, March 25, 1965.

In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966

Fighter Battling Siki's Wife Passes for White - December, 1924

Barney Ford was born a slave in Virginia. At the age of twenty-fire, he escaped and began a successful career in a variety of entrepreneurial ventures.By 1860, he was living in Denver and became a prosperous tycoon in the hotel, restaurant, and barbershop businesses, earning the nickname the "Black Baron of Colorado." Throughout the Civil War, he gave financial assistance, food, and jobs to escaped and free African Americans.

Women of Fauberg Treme, New Orleans and their dog. Faubourg Tremé is the oldest black neighborhood in America, and the origin of the southern civil rights movement and the birthplace of jazz.

Civil war soldier at 11 years of age.

The Supremes at Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral

American pacifist James Zwerg after being beaten by a mob in Montgomery, Alabama in 1960 as part of the Freedom Riders. Zwerg volunteered to leave the bus first upon arriving in Montgomery, knowing he’d be the blunt of the violent crowd’s aggression. He would have died that day if an anonymous black man hadn’t stepped in and saved his life by deflecting the mob’s attention to himself.

Susie King Taylor is one of the great women heroes in the 19th century. She was the first African-American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. She was also the first black army nurse, serving during the American Civil War. As the author of "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers", she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences.

Hose Company No. 4 | 1919 African American fire fighters stationed at Hose Company No. 4, Los Angeles, CA

Advertisement For Ebony Magazine - Jet Magazine, November 12, 1953

Joyce Bryant aka"The Black Marilyn Monroe" aka “The Bronze Blonde Bombshell" Photo by Carl van Vechten, 1953.

These three girls were part of a group of eight former slaves from New Orleans publicity tour to (1) raise money for schools that served former slaves run by abolitionist groups 1863, and (2) to arouse the sympathy of countrymen who were preoccupied by war, and more often than not ambivalent on the issue of African-American slavery. One of the major reasons for the great success of this campaign was that four of the children were of mixed race.....but looked white.

Lucille Baldwin Brown, the first black public county librarian, ca 1940s by State Library and Archives of Florida, via Flickr

Judy Lenteen Pace is an African American actress who was the first villainess on television in 1964. Pace starred as the tough Vickie Fletcher, a high-powered lawyer on the hit show “Peyton Place.” “Peyton Place” is the only prime-time scripted series ever to run episodes continuously for years without reruns or hiatuses. The “Peyton Place” series was also the first time a black family was represented in a dramatic series on television.

First Black Catholic Bishop Rev. Joseph O. Bowers - Jet Magazine, May 7, 1953 by vieilles_annonces, via Flickr