Women detective in the late 1800's.

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross (left) and Catherine Barscz (right) at the Racine Avenue Police Station, Chicago, June 5, 1943. In 1943 Evelyn “Jackie” Bross, was arrested on her way home from work for violating Chicago’s cross-dressing and public indecency ordinance. Bross, 19yrs at the time, was a machinist at a WWII defense plant. Chicago outlawed cross-dressing as early as 1851

Elevator 'girls' at Marshall Fields department store, Chicago, Illinois, 1947 ... yes, once upon a time there were actually people who ran elevators in just about every building. When they realized we were all smart enough to push the buttons ourselves ..... boom! Jobs lost! :-) See, it's not all about government. Sometimes jobs just disappear for logical cost-cutting reasons.

The youngest female partisan fighting against the fascists in Bulgaria in WWII. This picture is from October 1944. Elena Lagadinova was only 14-years-old. The chain around her neck was connected to her pistol so she would not lose it. She joined her father and three brothers fighting against the German-allied Bulgarian government when she was 11, running messages to the partisans while also trying to finish school.

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919 was a major racial conflict that began in Chicago, Illinois on July 27, 1919 and ended on August 3. During the riot, dozens died and hundreds were injured. It is considered the worst of the approximately 25 riots during the Red Summer, so named because of the violence and fatalities across the US. The combination of prolonged arson, looting, and murder was the worst race rioting in the history of Illinois.

Fe del Mundo, Harvard Medical School's first female student , was admitted because she was brilliant...and because they didn't realize she was a woman. Del Mundo founded the first pediatric hospital in the Philippines. She attended nine years before enrollment was opened to women.

A mother weeps after having to sell her children because of poverty. Chicago, 1948

Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg, 1932. Janet Bragg was a pioneer female African American pilot whose leadership in black pilot organizations in the 1930s created opportunities for others. She is seen here sitting on a fence at Harlem Airport, Chicago. SI-79-13664

Maude Collins - Ohio's First (and possibly America's first) Female Sheriff in 1925

Olive Oatman was 13 when she traveled with her family to California by wagon. Attacked by Indians who killed all of the family but Olive, her Sister (who later died of starvation) and her Brother (who escaped). Sold to the Mojave tribe as a slave, she was tattooed and taken in as "one of their own". She was rescued 5 yrs later. She married John Fairchild in 1860, moved to Sherman TX where she died in 1903 and was buried in West Hill Cemetery on Lamar St. in Sherman.

Bessie Coleman (1892-1926) was the first Black American female pilot ever.

1957: Eleanor Roosevelt’s pistol licence. Because she insisted on driving her own car without a guard, getting a pistol was her compromise with the Secret Service.

Texas Deputy U.S. Marshal Edward W. Johnson (at left) lost his right arm in an 1888 gunfight soon after this photograph was taken. He gained notoriety after an 1889 mob attacked the notorious Marlow Brothers during a jail transport, an incident that inspired the 1965 film Sons of Katie Elder. Also pictured: Texas Ranger Lorenzo K. Creekman (center) and Parker County Deputy Sheriff E.A. Hutchison (at right). – Courtesy George T. Jackson Jr. – Via Karen Patterson Farrar - #OldWest #WildWest

I have to say this is one of the beautiful post Mortem photos I have seen yet. Photo by Alice M. Boughton, ~ 1910... The woman on the left is deceased while the woman on the right looks to be holding her. They look to be sisters. This is a beautiful picture though.

old time radio 1940s

Matchgirls participating in a strike against Bryant & May in London, 1888. The strike was caused by the poor working conditions in the match factory, including fourteen-hour work days and the severe health complications of working with white phosphorus.

Dr. Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey. Despite enormous pressure, Dr. Kelsey refused to grant approval of Thalidomide for use in the USA while working at the FDA. Her refusal saved thousands of children from being born with deformaties. She also helped institute laws protecting patients during drug trials.

Mailman N. Sorenson poses with his heavy load of Christmas mail and parcels, 1929. Chicago History photo.

THE BLACK DAHLIA

Facial reconstruction of Queen Anne Boleyn by Emily Pooley. Interesting.

Wanted poster for Bonnie and Clyde ~ there's that famous dress. Really, 23 is terribly, terribly young. They threw their lives away for their god: Money.