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Elevator 'girls' at Marshall Fields department store, Chicago, Illinois, 1947 ... yes, once upon a time there were actually people who ran elevators in just about every building. When they realized we were all smart enough to push the buttons ourselves ..... boom! Jobs lost! :-) See, it's not all about government. Sometimes jobs just disappear for logical cost-cutting reasons.

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross (left) and Catherine Barscz (right) at the Racine Avenue Police Station, Chicago, June 5, 1943. In 1943 Evelyn “Jackie” Bross, was arrested on her way home from work for violating Chicago’s cross-dressing and public indecency ordinance. Bross, 19yrs at the time, was a machinist at a WWII defense plant. Chicago outlawed cross-dressing as early as 1851

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919 was a major racial conflict that began in Chicago, Illinois on July 27, 1919 and ended on August 3. During the riot, dozens died and hundreds were injured. It is considered the worst of the approximately 25 riots during the Red Summer, so named because of the violence and fatalities across the US. The combination of prolonged arson, looting, and murder was the worst race rioting in the history of Illinois.

"In 1943, Maria von Maltzan, a German aristocrat, took Hans Hirschel, her Jewish lover into her Berlin apartment to hide him from the Nazis. It was the time when the last Jews were supposed to be 'cleansed' out of Berlin. Since Hans had ingeniously faked his own suicide, he was registered as dead, and for a long while, no suspicion fell on Maria; until one day..." Read the rest of the story at the link.

Identity photo of Dirke Otten, who gave her identity card to a Jew in order to save her. Otten and her husband hid as many as 50 Jews in their home at one time

Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg, 1932. Janet Bragg was a pioneer female African American pilot whose leadership in black pilot organizations in the 1930s created opportunities for others. She is seen here sitting on a fence at Harlem Airport, Chicago. SI-79-13664

Etsyfrom Etsy

Set of 5 Gangster Wanted Posters, Bonnie & Clyde, Al Capone, Baby Face Nelson, John Dillinger, Machine Gun Kelly, prohibition

Wanted poster for Bonnie and Clyde ~ there's that famous dress. Really, 23 is terribly, terribly young. They threw their lives away for their god: Money.

1957: Eleanor Roosevelt’s pistol licence. Because she insisted on driving her own car without a guard, getting a pistol was her compromise with the Secret Service.

AN AMAZING WOMAN: James Gray was born Hannah Snell in 1723. After her baby died, her husband deserted her. She began dressing as a man, tracking down her husband who had been executed for murder. So she joined the Royal Marines, and was sent to battle twice. After, she told her story to the newspapers and was granted a military pension. She opened a pub called "The Female Warrior," remarried and had two children.

Dr. Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey. Despite enormous pressure, Dr. Kelsey refused to grant approval of Thalidomide for use in the USA while working at the FDA. Her refusal saved thousands of children from being born with deformaties. She also helped institute laws protecting patients during drug trials.