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    • Lindsay Berger

      Electron microscope image by FEI: Blood Clot on Gauze Dressing Fibres

    • rainbow sweeny

      Blood clot on gauze dressing fibres Partially dried red blood cells clotted on the cotton fibres of a gauze wound dressing.

    • Jade Maybee

      . Micro macro

    • Christopher Little

      Electron microscopy of partially dried red blood cells clotted on the cotton fibers of a gauze wound dressing.

    Tags:
    Gauze Dresses, Macros, Cell Clotted, Electronics Microscope, Wounded Dresses, Red Blood Cells, Dry Red, Blood Clotted, Cotton Fiber

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