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Five-finger retell! This is a simple way for students to remember how to write summaries. The teacher can hang these hands up in the classroom or students can simply use their own hands if they can't see the ones hung up. This lesson can be done by having students go through the five finger retell on a story they have previously read.

Reader's Notebook Response Pages for Literature *HALF-PAGE SET

Get students thinking deeply about their reading! A huge collection of response pages designed in an engaging notebook format. Use individually or create customized reader’s notebook packets. Use with virtually any piece of literature. Differentiated at three levels. Common Core aligned. Perfect for guided reading, book clubs, and practicing key reading skills. (Gr 2-5) $

Reading Games for Reading Centers (Inference, Sequence, Cause & Effect, & More)

"My students ask to play these everyday!" Students will love to practice inference, character traits, cause and effect, compare and contrast, and sequence with these engaging reading board games. Each game comes with a game board and 25+ game cards to help student practice these skills in a fun and exciting way!

A Reading Strategies Lesson: Finding Details and Writing Summaries

Blog post on Upper Elementary Snapshots about Finding Details and Writing Summaries. She uses a non-fiction text for this lesson. There are examples and anchor charts. There is also a link to a free article. Focused on fourth grade.

Anchor Charts for Elementary Grades on TpT! Each Anchor Chart file includes an individual student size (8.5x11) page and larger pieces to cut out and glue to large poster paper to create a super easy anchor chart you can reuse over and over! {Individual or get the bundle!}

How I turned my students into readers

Use these strategies to show your students how to love reading! Cute bookmarks for students to color! See it here http://performingineducation.com/2015/11/how-i-turned-my-students-into-readers.html

7 Amazing Anchor Charts | Scholastic.com The Teacher: Teresa Potosky, first-grade teacher, Dumont, New Jersey, and blogger at A Cupcake for the Teacher The Inspiration: “We create our anchor charts as a class,” says Potosky, who worked with her students to produce these charts while studying
a unit that covered nouns and adjectives. “My students give me words or pictures to include. Often, they will give me ideas that never even crossed my mind.