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    The Expulsion of the Acadians (also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, The Deportation, the Acadian Expulsion, Le Grand Dérangement) was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from present day Canadian Maritime provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island (an area also known as Acadie). The Expulsion (1755–1763) occurred during the French and Indian War.

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    • 🌷💕 Iris S.S. 💕🌷

      The Expulsion of the Acadians (also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, The Deportation, the #Acadian Expulsion, Le Grand Dérangement) was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from present day Canadian Maritime provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island (an area also known as Acadie). The Expulsion (1755–1763) occurred during the French and Indian War. #Canada

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    The Acadians are first Canadian settlers originating from France who were deported out of their homes and off their land in Nova Scotia by British Soldiers in 1755. Some families were scattered deeper into Canada but most went south into Florida and Louisiana where the word Acadian was shortened to 'Cajun'. My family stems from these roots

    Issued by the Mines Department of Great Britain during WWII to promote conservation. Circa 1939.

    The Acadians were French settlers of eastern Canada who were exiled from their land in the 1750s. The Cajuns are their descendants  who settled in Louisiana. Today, thousands of Acadian-Cajun  descendants cherish their rich  legacy of history, culture, & genealogy.

    An iconic church in Grand Pré commemorates the original French Acadian settlers - and their expulsion by the new British masters of Nova Scotia in the 1750s.

    Yes, Thanks! CAJUN ('ka:-j@n), n. A person of French Canadian descent born or living along the bayous, marshes, and prairies of southern Louisiana. The word Cajun began in 19th century Acadie (now Nova Scotia, Canada) when the Acadians began to arrive. The French of noble ancestry would say, "les Acadiens", while some referred to the Acadians as "le 'Cadiens", dropping the "A". Later came the Americans who could not pronounce "Acadien" or "'Cadien", so the word "Cajun" was born.

    Acadian Church, Wolfville, Nova Scotia

    Acadian Nova Scotia

    L'Acadie Acadia was made up of the present Atlantic provinces of Canada : New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island (then known as Île St. Jean), parts of Newfoundland, and parts of Maine. Unfortunately, this peaceful beginning was followed by 150 years of struggle between the French and English for control of the continent. Except for some short periods of British occupation, Acadia remained French up to 1713. The inlet of Port Royal is shown in an exaggerated .

    Acadian Deportation Cross

    17th-century French colonists settled in Acadia, a colony of New France. The colony was located in what is now Eastern Canada's Maritime, as well as part of Quebec. Although today most of the Acadians and Québécois are French speaking, Acadia was a distinct colony of New France, and was geographically and administratively separate from the French colony of Canada (modern day Quebec), which led to Acadians and Québécois developing two rather distinct histories and cultures

    This is the Swedish warship Vasa, it sank in 1628 and was recovered from the ocean in 1961 almost completely intact. This is the only remaining intact ship from the 1600's. This ship is housed in The Vasa Museum in Stockholm Sweden. A museum built around the ship.

    Acadian Genealogy Homepage; Definitions of Common Acadian Terms.

    Louisiana Acadian (Cajuns) Homes The Acadians (French: Acadiens, IPA: [akadjɛ̃]) are the descendants of the seventeenth-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located in the Canadian Maritime provinces — Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and in the US state of Maine).

    The sad history of state-sponsored ethnic cleansing in North America begins with the story of the 18th century expulsion of the Acadians by the British. Professor Amy Sturgis explains that the Acadians were peaceful French colonists who had prospered in Nova Scotia.

    Depiction of Evangeline. My daughter's namesake. For the Acadians, she symbolizes perserverence and hope.

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    8 mile long Confederation Bridge which connects Prince Edward Island to New Brunswick, Canada.