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  • Ian Bickle

    Urolithiasis is common and in comes in many forms, but it does get any bigger than a staghorn calculus. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/staghorn-calculus

  • Jessi Laird Markwell

    Staghorn calculi (also sometimes called coral calculi) obtain their characteristic shape by forming a cast of the renal pelvis and calices, thus resembling the horns of a stag. The vast majority of staghorn calculi are radiopaque and appear as branching calcific densities overlying the renal outline and may mimic an excretory phase IVP. Lamination within the stone is common. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/staghorn-calculus

Related Pins

Horseshoe kidneys are the most common type of renal fusion anomaly. They render the kidneys susceptible to trauma and are an independent risk factor for the development of renal calculi and transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. The kidneys are also orientated with the lower pole closest to the midline, which is the reverse of normal. radiopaedia.org/...

What a beautiful example of a: Staghorn calculi (also sometimes called coral calculi) obtain their characteristic shape by forming a cast of the renal pelvis and calices, thus resembling the horns of a stag. Staghorn calculi are the result of recurrent infection and are thus more commonly encountered in 4 women, those with renal tract anomalies, reflex, spinal cord injuries, neurogenic bladder or ileal ureteral diversion. Learn so much here: radiopaedia.org/...

Urolithiasis refers to the presence of calculi anywhere along the course of the urinary tracts. For the purpose of the article the terms urolithiasis, nephrolithiasis and renal or kidney stones are used interchangeably, although some authors have slightly varying definitions of each. Everything you want to know about renal stones: radiopaedia.org/...

Horseshoe kidneys are the most common type of renal fusion anomaly (see developmental renal anomalies). They render the kidneys susceptible to trauma and are an independent risk factor for the development of renal calculi and transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. A horseshoe kidney is formed by fusion across the midline of two distinct functioning kidneys, one on each side of the midline. Read more: radiopaedia.org/...

Acute bacterial pyelonephritis remains common and continues to have significant morbidity in certain patients groups. CT is the most sensitive modality for the renal tract, able to assess for renal calculi, gas, perfusion defects, collections and obstruction. Unfortunately it does have a significant radiation burden and should be used sparingly, especially in young patients. radiopaedia.org/...

Horseshoe kidneys are the most common type of renal fusion anomaly. They render the kidneys susceptible to trauma and are an independent risk factor for the development of renal calculi and transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. Horseshoe kidneys are frequently associated with both genitourinary and non-genitourinary malformations, and are also seen as part of a number of syndromes. radiopaedia.org/...

A pelvic kidney is a kidney that is seen fixed in the bony pelvis or across the spine. These patients are asymptomatic. Renal tract pathology (e.g. infection, calculus) can affect pelvic kidneys and thus the referred pain is not typical for the renal tract and it may be confused for appendicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease. radiopaedia.org/...

IVP shows a left lower ureteric calculus on control film most likely at the VUJ. See the whole of this great case of a traditional imaging modality: radiopaedia.org/...

Puncture needle for nephrostomy insertion for an infected system secondary to proximal ureteric stone seen on the control image. Urolithiasis refers to the presence of calculi anywhere along the course of the urinary tracts. For the purpose of the article the terms urolithiasis, nephrolithiasis and renal or kidney stones are used interchangeably. Read more: radiopaedia.org/...

A perinephric abscess may result due to rupture of a renal abscess into the perirenal space, but usually it develops directly from acute pyelonephritis. However, any inflammatory process outside the Gerota's fascia may also result in perinephric abscess. Such kind of abscesses have been seen quite frequently in diabetic patients with calculi and in patients with septic emboli. Read more: radiopaedia.org/...

Ureteric calculi or stones are ones that lie in the ureter, at any point from the pelvicoureteric junction to the vesicoureteric junction. They are the classic cause of renal colic type abdominal pain. It forms an important select component of the broader topic of urolithiasis. Ultrasound may be used for patients needing to avoid radiation such as pregnant women. It is also useful for assessing for the complications, such as hydronephrosis or pyonephrosis. radiopaedia.org/...

Labeled Soft Tissue Neck from KU Radiographic Anatomy