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Delta Sigma Theta Founder Ethel Carr Watson was from Parkersburg, West Virginia. During the significant March for Women's Suffrage, Ms. Watson confided that her family told her not to march for suffrage, but was forced to defy the order because she was selected to hold the banner since she was the tallest. She pursued her teaching career over a period of thirty years. She then retired and began a second career as a dramatic performer.

Delta Sigma Theta's 22 founders marched with honorary member Mary Church Terrell under the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority banner on the day prior to Woodrow Wilson's inauguration; they were the only black women's organization that participated in the march. They believed that black women needed the right to vote to protect against sexual exploitation, promote quality education, assist in the work force, and empower their race.

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations and worked for civil rights and suffrage.

from Oddee

10 Inspirational Olympic Moments

Wilma Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994), Olympian and member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. In the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games. A track and field champion, she elevated women's track to a major presence in the United States. She is also regarded as a civil rights and women's rights pioneer.

"An Ordinary Hero is the story of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, a little known Civil Rights worker who did the extraordinary. As a 19 year old college student in 1961, Joan had already participated in nearly three dozen protests and sit-ins when she was arrested for participating in the Freedom Rides. After spending two months at the infamous Parchman Penitentiary on death row she went on to attend Tougaloo College and was one of the first whites to pledge Delta Sigma Theta."

"An Ordinary Hero is the story of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, a little known Civil Rights worker who did the extraordinary. As a 19 year old college student in 1961, Joan had already participated in nearly three dozen protests and sit-ins when she was arrested for participating in the Freedom Rides. After spending two months at the infamous Parchman Penitentiary on death row she went on to attend Tougaloo College and was one of the first whites to pledge Delta Sigma Theta."