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Delta Sigma Theta Founder Ethel Carr Watson was from Parkersburg, West Virginia. During the significant March for Women's Suffrage, Ms. Watson confided that her family told her not to march for suffrage, but was forced to defy the order because she was selected to hold the banner since she was the tallest. She pursued her teaching career over a period of thirty years. She then retired and began a second career as a dramatic performer.

Six of the 22 Founders of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Back Row Standing L=>R Soror Founders Jimmie Bugg Middleton, Eliza P. Shippen, Vashti Turley Murphy. Seated L=>R Soror Founders ?Marguerite Young Alexander, Osceola Macarthy Adams, Soror Founder Florence Letcher Toms circa 1954.

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations and worked for civil rights and suffrage.

Delta Sigma Theta's 22 founders marched with honorary member Mary Church Terrell under the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority banner on the day prior to Woodrow Wilson's inauguration; they were the only black women's organization that participated in the march. They believed that black women needed the right to vote to protect against sexual exploitation, promote quality education, assist in the work force, and empower their race.

"An Ordinary Hero is the story of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, a little known Civil Rights worker who did the extraordinary. As a 19 year old college student in 1961, Joan had already participated in nearly three dozen protests and sit-ins when she was arrested for participating in the Freedom Rides. After spending two months at the infamous Parchman Penitentiary on death row she went on to attend Tougaloo College and was one of the first whites to pledge Delta Sigma Theta."

"An Ordinary Hero is the story of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, a little known Civil Rights worker who did the extraordinary. As a 19 year old college student in 1961, Joan had already participated in nearly three dozen protests and sit-ins when she was arrested for participating in the Freedom Rides. After spending two months at the infamous Parchman Penitentiary on death row she went on to attend Tougaloo College and was one of the first whites to pledge Delta Sigma Theta."

Oddeefrom Oddee

10 Inspirational Olympic Moments

Wilma Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994), Olympian and member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. In the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games. A track and field champion, she elevated women's track to a major presence in the United States. She is also regarded as a civil rights and women's rights pioneer.

Clara Belle Drisdale Williams -- born 1885, valedictorian at Prairie View Normal and Independent College, ca. 1905. Like most "Normal School" graduates, she began teaching (at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces) and took university courses during the summer. When she graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in English from NMCA (in 1937 at the age of 51) she became NMSU's first Black graduate. Her three sons all earned medical degrees, and she survived to 108.

Alexa Canady (born November 7, 1950) was the first African American woman to become a neurosurgeon when she completed her residency at the University of Minnesota in 1981. Dr. Canady was Chief of Neurosurgery at Children's Hospital of Michigan (1987-2001) and taught at Wayne State. After retirement she moved to Florida where she began a part-time practice in Pensacola. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, of which her mother Elizabeth is a past National President…

Bertha Pitts Campbell, (center) one of the 22 founders of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., at the 1981 reenactment of the Women's Suffrage March. (source- Jet Magazine)

USA TODAYfrom USA TODAY

Community wants to tell Tubman's story

Harriet Tubman’s funeral was held in Auburn after she died March 13, 1913. family photo

Dorothy Height (born March 24, 1912) was was the president of the National Council of Negro Women for 40 years, a national staff member of YWCA for over 30 years, president of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, adviser to Eleanor Roosevelt and Martin Luther King, and a civil rights activist until her death in 2010 at the age of 98. #TodayInBlackHistory

First Female Bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church; National Chaplain of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. Granddaughter of Delta Sigma Theta Founder, Vashti Turley Murphy.