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Daring Denmark: Fjords and firewater - six things you must do in Aalborg

Lindholm Høje (Lindholm Hills, from Old Norse haugr, hill or mound) is a major Viking burial site and former settlement situated to the north of and overlooking the city of Aalborg in Denmark. The southern (lower) part of Lindholm Høje dates to 1000 – 1050 AD, the Viking Age, while the northern (higher) part is significantly earlier, dating back to the 5th century AD.

"The Oseberg burial mound (Norwegian: Oseberghaugen ved Slagen from the Old Norse word haugr meaning mound or barrow) contained numerous grave goods and two female human skeletons. The ship's interment into its burial mound dates from 834 AD, but parts of the ship date from around 800, and the ship itself is thought to be older. It was excavated by Norwegian archaeologist Haakon Shetelig and Swedish archaeologist Gabriel Gustafson in 1904-1905.

Aerial view of Lindholm Hoje, a Viking cemetery in Denmark close to the city of Aalborg. From this angle you can clearly see the stone grave markers which surround many burials with the symbolic silhouette of a ship. Like many other Indo-European cultures, the Vikings often associated death with a journey over water, an ships were also very important in daily life.

Vikings Infographic. I'm a little wary of posting an infographic from the History Channel, notorious for rarely doing its history homework, not to mention all its ancient alien programming posing as real science, and they should have done spellcheck first, but...

In Viking society, a völva was an elderly woman who had released herself from the strong family bonds that normally surrounded women in the Old Norse clan society. She travelled the land, usually followed by a retinue of young people, and she was summoned in times of crisis. She had immense authority and she charged well for her services.[7]

Viking cemetery in Färjås, Sweden. Not all Vikings are buried/burned at sea. The larger the ‘stone’, the higher the rank

The Vikings were Norsemen who came to raid,pillage and settle in Scotland. Expert sailors, they made their way across the treacherous North Sea in longships from Norway and Denmark from the late 8th century. The Norse began to settle in Scotland and gradually merged with the local people. In the west of Scotland, in the Hebrides, the locals and the Norse became known as the Gall-Gael. Orkney and Shetland and the north of Scotland were dominated by the Norse for hundreds of years.

The Stenkvista runestone in Södermanland, Sweden, shows Thor's hammer instead of a cross. Only two such runestones are known.[13