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    Queen Isabella, the "she-wolf" of France (1295-1358). Isabella was the daughter of Philip IV of France & Joan I of Navarre. Isabella married Edward II of England & became Queen Consort. Isabella was praised for her beauty, diplomatic skills & intelligence. Her husband was an ineffectual king who came to be resented by his subjects. Isabella saw an opportunity, & raised an army & deposed her husband. She also managed to end the war with Scotland before her son took the throne as Edward III.

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    • Janice Stadelmann-Elder

      Isabella of France (1295 – 22 August 1358), sometimes described as the She-wolf of France, was Queen consort of England as the wife of Edward II of England. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre. Queen Isabella was notable at the time for her beauty, diplomatic skills, and intelligence

    • ♥ Crystal ♥

      Edward II's wife, Isabella (c.1292-1358), bore him two sons, Edward III and John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall (1316-1336), and two daughters, Isabella and Joanna (1321-1362), wife of David II, King of Scotland. After the execution of her paramour, Roger Mortimer, in 1330, Isabella retired from public life; she died at Hertford on the 23rd of August 1358.

    • Cl Cunningham

      Queen consort of England (Isabella of France), married to Edward II King of England (Reign: July 7, 1307 to Jan 25, 1327). A 15th-century depiction of Isabella.

    • Brandy A

      The She-wolf of France, Isabella of France, Edward II's queen was one of the most notorious femme fatales in history.

    • Sharon Murphy

      Isabella of France: 14th century depiction of Isabella Queen consort of England - Wikipedia

    • Ana Towns

      Queen Isabella, the posthumously named "she-wolf" of France (1295-1358) was the daughter of Philip IV of France Joan of Navarre. Isabella married Edward II of England became Queen Consort. Isabella was praised for her beauty, diplomatic skills intelligence. Her husband was an ineffectual tyrannical king who came to be resented by his subjects. Isabella raised an army deposed her husband. She also managed to end the war with Scotland before her son took the throne as Edward III.

    • Hillary Nina

      Isabella of France (wife of King Edward II of England) Ancestor

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