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    1936 -- For the first and only time in Olympic history, the Vatican City fielded teams in several events, including the Womens' Rifles. The team, lead by Mother Superior Maria Grazia, didn't win any medals, but became minor celebrities. In 1937, they did an international exhibition tour of several Latin American countries and then the United States, where using the stage name "Nuns With Guns" they were a major attraction at the 1937 State Fairs in Iowa and Minnesota. With the very real prospect of war in Europe, the Vatican decided that "Nuns with Guns" wasn't a good image for the Catholic Church, so the Vatican Women's Rifle Team was disbanded in February, 1938. Sister Juliette(far right), however, left the order in 1942 to join the French underground as a sharpshooter. She was credited with the assassination of several Nazi officials and provided support for numerous covert operations. In 1946, she was awarded the Médaille Militaire by the French government. After a failed attempt to enter politics, she entered the convent again in 1949.

    MOTHER TERESA (1910-1997) as a teen in native Albanian clothing.

    United States President Richard Nixon resigns as President in 1974 while facing charges for impeachment for the Watergate scandal.

    Policemen measuring Peggy Graves' swim suit, to check whether it meets minimum 1933 clothing requirements.

    bookplate of the United States Seal

    "Sure I find it touching, honestly, but awards are not as important to me as when I meet a ten year old kid who says, I love Captain Jack Sparrow...that's real magic for me" - Johnny Depp

    Sharpshooting nuns

    Things I would do...

    Abandoned State Hospital

    Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders 1898 Spanish American War.The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States, effectively the result of American intervention in the Cuban War of Independence.

    Things no one says anymore...

    Hugh O’Flaherty was an Irish Catholic priest who saved about 4,000 Allied soldiers and Jews in Rome during World War II. O’Flaherty used his status as a priest and his protection by the Vatican to conceal 4000 escapees – Allied soldiers and Jews – in flats, farms and convents. Despite the Nazis desperately wanting to stop his actions, his protection by the Vatican prevented them officially arresting him. He saved the majority of Jews in Rome.

    Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander (1898 – 1989) achieved a lot of firsts in her life. She was the first African American woman to receive a Ph.D. in the United States, the first woman to receive a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, the first African American woman to be admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar, and was the first national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

    The Only Woman Electrocuted in Georgia's Electric Chair Such is the story of Lena Baker, an African-American mother of three, who was electrocuted at the Georgia State Prison in Reidsville. She was convicted for the fatal shooting of E. B. Knight, a white Cuthbert, Georgia mill operator she was hired to care for after he broke his leg. She was 44 and the only woman ever executed in Georgia’s electric chair. For Baker, a Black maid in the segregated south in the 1940’s, her s...

    An old school bus: 1937

    William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody (February 26, 1846 – January 10, 1917) was an American soldier, bison hunter and showman. He was born in the Iowa Territory (now the U.S. state of Iowa), in Le Claire but lived several years in Canada before his family moved to the Kansas Territory. Buffalo Bill received the Medal of Honor in 1872 for service to the US Army as a scout. One of the most colorful figures of the American Old West

    Women's Suffrage: August 18, 1920 – The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is ratified, guaranteeing women's right to vote.

    African-American inventor Elijah the Real McCoy was born in Canada on May 2, 1844, the son of escaped slaves. During his life time McCoy received 57 patents for devices which improved versions of his automatic lubrication process. The high quality of McCoy's inventions gained such notoriety that the phrase "the Real McCoy" was coined to distinguish his inventions from cheap imitations.

    1920 policewoman

    Victoria Claflin Woodhull the first woman candidate for President of the United States in 1872 from the Equal Rights Party supporting women's suffrage.

    Bessie Coleman, the daughter of a poor, southern, African American family, became one of the most famous women and African Americans in aviation history.