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ca. 827 BCE - Jehu King of Israel giving tribute to King Shalmaneser III of Assyria, on the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III from Nimrud. BM

ca. 827 BCE - Jehu King of Israel giving tribute to King Shalmaneser III of Assyria, on the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III from Nimrud. BM

"The Earliest Known Fragment of the New Testament (Circa 100 –150 AC ):  .... the Gospel of John 18:31-33, in Greek, and the back (verso) contains lines from verses 37-38."

"The Earliest Known Fragment of the New Testament (Circa 100 –150 AC ): .... the Gospel of John 18:31-33, in Greek, and the back (verso) contains lines from verses 37-38."

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III was made in the 9th century BC in ancient Assyria. It is about 6+ feet in height & is made of fine grained black limestone. The cuneiform text reads "Tribute of Jehu, son of Omri.." Jehu and Omri were Israelite kings who are referred to in the Bible (1&2 Kings). A close-up photo showing an Israelite, possibly Jehu, bowing to the king of Assyria can be seen by clicking "Read more" below. The obelisk was found in 1846 in Nimrud and is now in the British…

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III was made in the 9th century BC in ancient Assyria. It is about 6+ feet in height & is made of fine grained black limestone. The cuneiform text reads "Tribute of Jehu, son of Omri.." Jehu and Omri were Israelite kings who are referred to in the Bible (1&2 Kings). A close-up photo showing an Israelite, possibly Jehu, bowing to the king of Assyria can be seen by clicking "Read more" below. The obelisk was found in 1846 in Nimrud and is now in the British…

This detail shows the earliest surviving picture of an Israelite: the Biblical Jehu, king of Israel, brought or sent his tribute in around 841 BC. Ahab, son of Omri, king of Israel, had lost his life in battle a few years previously, fighting against the king of Damascus at Ramoth-Gilead (I Kings xxii. 29-36). His second son (Joram) was succeeded by Jehu, a usurper, who broke the alliances with Phoenicia and Judah, and submitted to Assyria.

This detail shows the earliest surviving picture of an Israelite: the Biblical Jehu, king of Israel, brought or sent his tribute in around 841 BC. Ahab, son of Omri, king of Israel, had lost his life in battle a few years previously, fighting against the king of Damascus at Ramoth-Gilead (I Kings xxii. 29-36). His second son (Joram) was succeeded by Jehu, a usurper, who broke the alliances with Phoenicia and Judah, and submitted to Assyria.

"The Merneptah Stele — also known as the Israel Stele or Victory Stele of Merneptah — is an inscription by the Ancient Egyptian king Merneptah (reign:1213 to 1203 BC), which appears on the reverse side of a granite stele erected by the king Amenhotep III. It was discovered by Flinders Petrie in 1896 at Thebes.

"The Merneptah Stele — also known as the Israel Stele or Victory Stele of Merneptah — is an inscription by the Ancient Egyptian king Merneptah (reign:1213 to 1203 BC), which appears on the reverse side of a granite stele erected by the king Amenhotep III. It was discovered by Flinders Petrie in 1896 at Thebes.

Cyrus Cylinder (c. 539 B.C.E.) -- an archaeological artifact that independently confirms a Biblical account told in the Book of Ezra. King Cyrus of Persia issued an edict that permitted the Jewish exiles in Babylonia (which Cyrus had just conquered) “ ‘to go up to Jerusalem in Judah, and rebuild the house of the Lord, the God of Israel,’ ” which the Babylonian troops had destroyed, and to return to their homes (Ezra 1:1–4).

Cyrus Cylinder (c. 539 B.C.E.) -- an archaeological artifact that independently confirms a Biblical account told in the Book of Ezra. King Cyrus of Persia issued an edict that permitted the Jewish exiles in Babylonia (which Cyrus had just conquered) “ ‘to go up to Jerusalem in Judah, and rebuild the house of the Lord, the God of Israel,’ ” which the Babylonian troops had destroyed, and to return to their homes (Ezra 1:1–4).

This limestone monument, known as the Kurkh Monolith, is approximately seven feet high and is now located in the British Museum. Discovered in 1861 in Kurkh, Turkey, it was originally carved in c. 852 BC by the Assyrians. The cuneiform writing on the monument refers to a battle involving King Ahab of Israel, who is also frequently referred to in the Bible (cf. 1 Kings 16-22). Mystery of History Volume 1, Lesson 36 #MOHI36

This limestone monument, known as the Kurkh Monolith, is approximately seven feet high and is now located in the British Museum. Discovered in 1861 in Kurkh, Turkey, it was originally carved in c. 852 BC by the Assyrians. The cuneiform writing on the monument refers to a battle involving King Ahab of Israel, who is also frequently referred to in the Bible (cf. 1 Kings 16-22). Mystery of History Volume 1, Lesson 36 #MOHI36

Uzziah Tomb Inscription. Text details archaeological discoveries that  verify Biblical accounts.

Archaeology Proves the Bible Record

Uzziah Tomb Inscription. Text details archaeological discoveries that verify Biblical accounts.

The fragment is said to date from the period of the Jewish King Joash, who ruled the area 2,800 years ago.

The fragment is said to date from the period of the Jewish King Joash, who ruled the area 2,800 years ago.

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