Explore Medical Students, Medical School, and more!

Grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated.

Zombie cage or mortsafe.Urban legend: this is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated.

This is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent.  The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated.

This is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated. --- Wow, We Are A Bunch Of Weird Humans Who Need Prayer ---

This is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated.

This is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated.//actually I believe it was to deter grave robbers

Mortsafes were metal basket coffin covers buried with the coffin placed inside and removed after a couple of weeks when the corpse was no longer fresh enough to be of value to grave robbers, then used again to protect fresh graves. Body snatchers would dig up and sell corpses to anatomists for dissection.

Mortsafes Mortsafes were contraptions designed to protect graves from disturbance. The necessity for medical students to learn anatomy by attending dissections of human subjects was frustrated by the.

The grave of Margorie McCall, who rose from the grave in Lurgan, Ireland...After succumbing to a fever of some sort in 1705, Irish woman Margorie McCall was hastily buried to prevent the spread of whatever had done her in. Margorie was buried with a valuable ring, which her husband had been unable to remove due to swelling. This made her an even better target for body snatchers, who could cash in on both the corpse and the ring. click through to read more

The legend of Margorie McCall - Lived once, buried twice.

The grave of Margorie McCall, who rose from the grave in Lurgan, Ireland.After succumbing to a fever of some sort in Irish woman Margorie McCall was hastily buried to prevent the spread of whatever had done her in.

Taphephobia - the fear of being buried alive. Before the advent of modern medicine, the fear was not entirely irrational. Safety Coffins, complete with bell attached to string in case of the deceased being buried alive became available in the 18th and 19th centuries -- he or she could then "ring" for help. Urban legend suggests that the phrases 'saved by the bell' and 'dead ringer' are both derived from the notion of the coffin bell.

Taphephobia, The Fear of Being Buried Alive

Coffins of the Victorian Period came equipped with an extensive system of the bell, which reportedly deceased person can ring should they not actually be deceased. Gravediggers were occasionally paid to keep watch over the graves and listen for the bells.

pere-lachaise-cemetary Paris......interesting, beautiful and in ths case creepy headstones...take time to spend a few hours here when in Paris

A Collection of Creepy Headstones

This grave in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Although I hated Paris, I loved it here at Georges Rodenbach's grave.

Victorian syringe case for cocaine by Science Museum London. #vintage #drugs sciencemuseumdiscovery.com

"Victorian syringe case for cocaine by Science Museum London. An interesting article on the Addictive History of Medicine is here, mentioning Holmes, of course." cocaine was used as a normal remedy for colds

A Victorian-era lachrymosa, also called lachrymatory, tear catchers, or tear vials. Sometimes worn on a necklace, sometimes merely held, they were used the gather the tears wept by mourners at funerals. One type of lachrymosa had a special top which allowed the tears to evaporate (signifying the time to stop mourning), others had a sealed top to allow the tears to last for a year, at which point they would be poured on the grave of the person whom the tears were wept for.

A glass Victorian-era lachrymosa, also called lachrymatory, TEAR CATCHERS, or tear vials. Sometimes worn on a necklace, used to gather the tears wept by mourners at funerals.

One of the most-visited graves in Jerusalem belongs to Oskar Schindler, the German factory-owner and Nazi Party member credited with saving the lives of 1098 Jews during the Second World War.    His grave in the Catholic cemetery on the southern slope of Mount Zion is visited by Jews, Christians and people of no religious faith

Oskar Schindler, credited with saving the lives of 1098 Jews during the WWII. His grave in the Catholic cemetery on the southern slope of Mount Zion is visited by Jews, Christians and people of no religious faith

Pinterest
Search