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Tudor Death's Head Ring An exceptionally rare Tudor memento mori ring, circa 1550 -1600. Such rings were a timely reminder of the importance of spiritual preparation for death and one is listed in Henry VIII's inventory : A ring of golde with a deathes hedde. This high carat gold ring has a hexagonal bezel with central skull, around which is inscribed the name of the deceased, Iames [James] Porlace. The ring is decorated with volutes and foliate shoulders.

Tudor Mori Ring-Excerpt: Circa 1580,a hexagonal scalloped bezel set with a white enamel skull and surrounded by the Latin motto : 'Coglia Mori' - 'plucked by death'. Such rings were a timely reminder of the importance of preparation for death and one is listed in Henry VIII's inventory : A ringe of gold with a deathes hedde'.

"ER RING" The ring was removed from Elizabeth I’s finger after her death on March 24th 1603. It is mother-of-pearl, the band set with rubies. The ‘E’ has diamonds set over a blue enamel ‘R’. A pearl is also clearly visible. This ring's stunning façade hides a secret – the head is hinged and within it lie two miniature enamel portraits, one of Elizabeth c. 1575 and one of an unnamed woman wearing a costume of Henry VIII’s reign. It is thought that she is Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth's mother.

Locket with locks of George Washington and Martha Washington’s hair Sold at James D. Julia Auctions August 5, 2009 for $ 7,475.00

A Tudor Pomander or Musk Ball. Because of the bad scents which accompanied Tudor England settings, MUSK BALLS were part their lives. Usually, an orange was placed inside the BALL to freshen the air with pleasant scents. I suppose it is like our scent candles today. Amazing 16th century object from the Queen’s collection at Windsor Castle, the Round Tower. It probably was in the collection of Queen Elizabeth I. It was found in the River Thames at Windsor.

from Telegraph.co.uk

Pictures of the day: 14 December 2011

The Glastonbury Grace Cup is pictured at Glastonbury Abbey. The carved oak tankard, which is said to have been saved from King Henry VIII's looters during the Dissolution, has returned to its historical home for the first time in 125 years.