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  • Sandie LaNae

    Stewart Indian School, Stewart, Nevada. Atrocities galore went on when the school opened up. Young Native Americans were yanked from their tribes, sent here, and most were never seen or heard from again. Abuse and sickness were the cause of many children’s deaths. Numerous ghostly apparitions, cold spots, doors slamming and screaming inside boarded up structures have been documented for decades. Many pictures taken of the buildings at night show phantom children looking out the windows.

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