There’s more to see...
Sign up to discover and save different things to try in 2015.
Visit Site

Also on these boards

Related Pins

'Homer Clobbered by Chongo' (2009) by New Mexico-based Cochiti Pueblo ceramic artist Diego Romero (b.1964). Ceramic, paint, found objects. via sofaexpo on Flickr

sculpture in Portishead. I think this is so cool because it captures the movement of a natural element within the element itself.

  • Sarah Klein

    I love this! It is such a simple concept to represent but seems like it must have been very hard to execute.

  • Luke Robert

    This looks awesome! Obvious question but it's made of glass I'm assuming?

  • Luke Robert

    dumb question*

  • Hannah Rosetti

    This is not only beautiful, but also really clever! I love the simplicity of it, yet it is also really interesting.

  • Pe Gum

    Amazing!

Grave stele of a little girl, ca. 450–440 B.C. Greek. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Fletcher Fund, 1927 (27.45) #hands #Connections

(via Angel Monuments) To me, this image represents the grieving women who wept at Yeshua’s tomb.

Dead or Variations on the Symbol of Lilith Model: Frida Gustavsson / Photographer: Annika Aschberg

Torso of draped, flying Greek The Metropolitan Museum of Art Statuette of Nike (personification of victory), late 5th century B.C.; Classical Greek Terracotta Source: www.metmuseum.org...

Shannon Goff, Thunder & Lightning, Ceramic, 2010, 13" x 13' x"17" by TelegraphArt, via Flickr

saint petersburg russia, state hermitage museum

Steatopygous female figure, ca. 4500–4000 B.C.; Final Neolithic Cycladic Marble. This figure, now missing its head, is a masterful example of a rare type known as steatopygous, characterized by a fleshy abdomen and massive thighs and buttocks, all undoubtedly indicative of nourishment and fertility. In contrast, the figure's upper torso is flat in profile with the arms typically framing V-shaped, pendant breasts. The corpulent, markedly stylized, thighs taper to diminutive, stumplike feet.MET