This image from Nasa's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a stellar nursery containing thousand of young stars & developing protostars near the sword of the constellation Orion.

This image from Nasa's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a stellar nursery containing thousand of young stars & developing protostars near the sword of the constellation Orion.

Utterly unbelievable photos, taken on board the ISS. Long exposures show star trails, but also the Earth in motion. NASA_JSC_Photo, via Flickr

Utterly unbelievable photos, taken on board the ISS. Long exposures show star trails, but also the Earth in motion. NASA_JSC_Photo, via Flickr

This particular picture was taken by Vasiliy Rumyantsev in Crimea. This is the most complicated picture captured by this photographer. In order to capture an analemma, each picture must be taken from the same location at the same time for a year – this is no easy task. Between August 30, 1998 and August 19, 1999. http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/solar-analemma/

This particular picture was taken by Vasiliy Rumyantsev in Crimea. This is the most complicated picture captured by this photographer. In order to capture an analemma, each picture must be taken from the same location at the same time for a year – this is no easy task. Between August 30, 1998 and August 19, 1999. http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/solar-analemma/

The swirling gas and dark dust lanes of the nebula NGC 2264 is shown above. The light being produced in this image has two sources. First, the bright stars in the image are ionizing nearby hydrogen gas, which re-emits light as it cools back down. Additionally, the gas and dust scatters some of the starlight, in much the same way the Earth’s atmosphere scatters blue light, producing our blue skies.

The swirling gas and dark dust lanes of the nebula NGC 2264 is shown above. The light being produced in this image has two sources. First, the bright stars in the image are ionizing nearby hydrogen gas, which re-emits light as it cools back down. Additionally, the gas and dust scatters some of the starlight, in much the same way the Earth’s atmosphere scatters blue light, producing our blue skies.

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