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Greek Mythology: The Hus Krommyon (or Crommyonian Sow) was a monstrous wild pig which terrorized the countryside around Krommyon on the Korinthian Isthmus. It was the pet of an old hag named Phaia ("the Grey"). Both the boar and its mistress were slain by Theseus when the hero was travelling the road from Troizenos to Athens clearing the thoroughfare of its assorted bandits and miscreants.

Crommyonian Sow- Greek myth: a wild pig that ravaged the region around the village of Crommyon between Megara and Corinth. It was slain by Theseus.

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Asteria - Goddess of the Stars Greek Mythology 5x7 Card

'Asteria - Goddess of the Stars' Greek Mythology.

Greek Mythology: The Automatones were metalic statues of animal, men and monsters crafted and made animate by the divine smith Hephaistos. Automatons were also manufactured by the great Athenian craftsman Daidalos.

The Norns in Norse mythology are Goddesses who rule the destiny of Gods and men. The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. Whereas the origin of the name norn is uncertain, it may derive from a word meaning "to twine" and which would refer to their twining the thread of fate.

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Orpheus and Eurydice Greek Mythology Original Painting

greek mythology | Orpheus and Eurydice Greek Mythology Original by EmilyBalivet

Greek Mythology: Ouranos (or Uranus) was the primeval god (protogenos) of the sky. The Greeks imagined the sky as a solid dome of brass, decorated with stars, whose edges descended to rest upon the outermost limits of the flat earth. Ouranos was the literal sky, just as his consort Gaia was the earth. Ouranos and Gaia fathered twelve sons and six daughters. The eldest of these--the giant Kyklopes and Hekatonkheires--he locked away inside the belly of Earth. Gaia suffered immense pain...

In Greek mythology, Planē or Plane (Greek: Πλανε, pronounced "play-nee") was a Goddess and Personification of Error. Her name derived from the Greek term for 'wandering'

Greek Mythology: The Seilenoi (or Sileni) were elderly rustic spirits (daimones) in the train of the god Dionysos. They were sons of the first Seilenos and the fathers of the tribes of Satyrs and Oreiades (mountain nymphs). The Seilenoi were depicted as fat, elderly, white-haired satyrs with horse's tail and ears, and snub nose. They were often covered in fluffy white hair, and sometimes sported a pair of ox horns. The twelve male guardians of the infant Dionysos known as Pheres...

Greek Mythology: Geras was the spirit (daimon) of old age, one of the malevolent spirits spawned by the goddess Nyx (Night). He was depicted as a tiny shrivelled up old man. Geras' opposite number was the goddess of youth, Hebe.

In Greek mythology, Bolbe (Greek: Βόλβη) was an extremely beautiful Lake Goddess or Nymph who dwelled in a Thessalian lake of the same name (modern Lake Volvi). She was the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys. Like other lake Gods and Goddesses, Bolbe's offspring were Limnades who are Nymphs living in fresh water lakes. According to Athenaeus, Bolbe was the mother of Olynthus by Heracles.

The inventor of the wagon or plough, Greek Mythology: Bootes Constellation. Bootes: a son of the goddess Demeter. As a reward for this service to mankind he was placed amongst the stars as the constellation Bootes. His oxen and plough were set alongside him as the Wain, i.e., the constellations Ursa Major and Minor. (Hyginus 2.4 on Hermippus and Petellides)

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Eidyia The Ocean Goddess 5x7 Blank Greeting Card

Eidyia The Ocean Goddess In Greek mythology, Eidyia is an Oceanid, one of the three thousand daughters of the Titans, Oceanus and Tethys. Her name was derived from the Greek word eidô, "to see" or "know." In the familial sense she probably personified the magical power of the eye, which in Greek superstition was the source of the witch's supernatural power. Art and quote by Emily Balivet

Greek Mythology: Nemesis was the goddess of indignation against, and retribution for, evil deeds and undeserved good fortune. She was a personification of the resentment aroused in men by those who commited crimes with apparent impunity, or who had inordinate good fortune. Nemesis directed human affairs in such a way as to maintain equilibrium. Her name means she who distributes or deals out. Happiness and unhappiness were measured out by her, care being taken that happiness was not...

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Origin of the days of the week…

Origin of the days of the week...Paxton has quite the fascination with Greek/Egyptian/roman mythology. He will love this

Greek Mythology: Cepheus, Constellation. Cepheus: A King of Aethiopia and father of the lovely Andromeda. He was forced to sacrifice his daughter to a sea monster because the boasts of his wife Cassiopea offended the gods. But the hero Perseus slew the beast and rescued her. As a memorial the whole family - Cepheus, Cassiopea, Andromeda and Perseus - were placed amongst the stars. (Hyginus 2.9)

Greek Mythology: The Drakones of Medea were a pair of winged, serpentine Drakones which drew the flying chariot of the witch Medea. She summoned them to escape from Korinthos following the murder of King Kreon, his daughter Kreousa and her own children by Jason.