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    • Jack Morlock

      2009- Green Roof Garden unveiled Atop the Plant Conservation Science Center, a 16,000 square-foot green roof garden was established. It became the largest, most encompassing such trial in the country with 40,000 plants representing 200 different species and cultivars.

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    2011- Trellis Bridge opened The Bridge stretched across a waterscape, connecting Evening Island with the Lavin Evaluation Garden.

    2010- Fall Bulb Festival debut Featuring hundreds of varieties of bulbs, along with food, music, and activities, the first Fall Bulb Festival was held at the Garden with support from the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society.

    1972- Chicago Horticultural Society’s children’s programs began at the Garden, and the first summer vegetable garden project for needy children was launched.

    1973- Education Center Groundbreaking Work began to create a site for an array of public activities and programs.

    1973- First flower show The first flower show was held on-site. Currently, all flower shows held at the Garden are part of the American Flower Show Series.

    1976- tram tours began Two trams were acquired, and in honor of the nation’s bicentennial, 2.7-mile tram tours were offered to visitors.

    1976- First Holiday Festival

    1977- First Bonsai Show The Midwest Bonsai Society hosted its first Mid-America Bonsai Show and Sale at the Garden.

    1980- Chicago Botanic Garden officially named The Botanic Garden of the Chicago Horticultural Society was formally dedicated as the Chicago Botanic Garden.

    1980- Weed Sale debut Volunteers hosted the Garden’s first Weed Sale. Currently, this event is called the Roadside Flower Sale.

    1981- Edith and Albert Farwell Landscape Garden opened Visitors to this garden began to see an array of planting options for their own home landscaping needs.

    1981- Shoin House assembled Seven carpenters took one year to complete this building in the soon-to-open Japanese Garden designed by Koichi Kawana. No nails were used in the original construction. Shoin House is a tribute to traditional Samurai retreat quarters – a place of peace and tranquility.

    1983- Aquatic and Bulb Gardens dedicated The Kresge Aquatic Garden and Edna Kanaly Graham Bulb Garden were dedicated as part of the Home Landscape Demonstration Gardens.

    1983- Heritage Garden and Linnaeus Sculpture Dedicated The Gertrude B. Nielsen Heritage Garden and the Carolus Linnaeus sculpture by Robert Berks opened and were dedicated.

    2009- Green Roof Garden unveiled Atop the Plant Conservation Science Center, a 16,000 square-foot green roof garden was established. It became the largest, most encompassing such trial in the country with 40,000 plants representing 200 different species and cultivars.

    2009- Spooky Pooch Parade debut The popular costume parade for dogs was moved from winter, when it was called the Reindog Parade, to fall when the weather is warmer.

    2006- Windy City Harvest started Windy City Harvest, a classroom and hands-on training program in organic vegetable and plant production, welcomed its first group of students. The program prepares Chicago residents for jobs in the urban agriculture and green horticulture industries.

    2003- Crescent and Esplanade opened The Esplanade display opened, featuring dramatic elm allees and a pavilion lined with sheared cone topiaries and a row of waterspouts and pools. The Crescent, part of the Esplanade, was shaped with classical elements of garden design with a clean, modern perspective and bold plantings of annuals and hundreds of evergreen boxwoods. Together, these spaces welcomed visitors to the water’s edge.

    2003- Green Youth Farm Introduced Students began attending the summer high school apprenticeship program that fosters interest in horticulture, agriculture, and green entrepreneurship.

    2002- Naturalistic Garden renovated The updated garden housing woodland, prairie, bird and butterfly gardens, was renamed the Native Plant Garden.

    2002- Gardens of the Great Basin opened Evening Island (formerly Evergreen Island), Lakeside Gardens, and Water Gardens opened. Together, they represent the largest horticultural development in the Chicago Botanic Garden’s history.