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Martin R. Delany over the course of a long life (1812-85), a writer, editor, abolitionist, Harvard medical student, physician, judge, acquaintance of John Brown, and the first African American commissioned a major in the Army. He is also widely considered America’s first black nationalist, the forerunner of Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Malcolm X.

Martin R. Delany over the course of a long life (1812-85), a writer, editor, abolitionist, Harvard medical student, physician, judge, acquaintance of John Brown, and the first African American commissioned a major in the Army. He is also widely considered America’s first black nationalist, the forerunner of Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Malcolm X.

Annie Malone,1927 the country's first African American millionaire.  Malone built a very successful business creating haircare  products  for African American women.  In 1918, Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade  school to train beauticians and barbers as well as secretaries & bookkeepers to work on the marketing side of the business.  Poro was so successful that by the 1930s Malone was one of the wealthiest women in the world.  Missouri History Museum.

Annie Malone,1927 the country's first African American millionaire. Malone built a very successful business creating haircare products for African American women. In 1918, Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade school to train beauticians and barbers as well as secretaries & bookkeepers to work on the marketing side of the business. Poro was so successful that by the 1930s Malone was one of the wealthiest women in the world. Missouri History Museum.

Charlotte Ray   February 27, 1872 Charlotte Ray graduates from Howard Law School. She is the first African American lawyer in the U.S.

Charlotte Ray February 27, 1872 Charlotte Ray graduates from Howard Law School. She is the first African American lawyer in the U.S.

Engraving of Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885), editor, author, physician, abolitionist, black nationalist, colonizationist, and army officer. In 1847 Delany joined Frederick Douglass as co-editor of a newspaper titled "The North Star".

Engraving of Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885), editor, author, physician, abolitionist, black nationalist, colonizationist, and army officer. In 1847 Delany joined Frederick Douglass as co-editor of a newspaper titled "The North Star".

Famous African American Marines | James Anderson, Jr., the first African American United States Marine ...

Famous African American Marines | James Anderson, Jr., the first African American United States Marine ...

Frederick Madison Roberts was the son of Andrew Jackson Roberts and Ellen Wayles Hemings - the grand-daughter of Sally Hemings. He was the first African American elected to the California State Assembly in 1918

Room of slave who had six of Thomas Jefferson's children is discovered

Frederick Madison Roberts was the son of Andrew Jackson Roberts and Ellen Wayles Hemings - the grand-daughter of Sally Hemings. He was the first African American elected to the California State Assembly in 1918

"Cudjoe" is believed to be the last slave born in Africa and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences, including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During that interview in 1928, Hurston made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western hemisphere of an African transported through the transatlantic slave trade.

"Cudjoe" is believed to be the last slave born in Africa and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences, including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During that interview in 1928, Hurston made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western hemisphere of an African transported through the transatlantic slave trade.

Osborne Anderson was the only African American to Survive, among the five Black Men that accompanied John Brown on the raid on Harpers Ferry!  In 1861 Anderson wrote A Voice From Harper’s Ferry. He believed that southern accounts were biased, he felt compelled to give an account of the event from the raiders’ perspective. http://www.cafepress.com/gkcstore

Osborne Anderson was the only African American to Survive, among the five Black Men that accompanied John Brown on the raid on Harpers Ferry! In 1861 Anderson wrote A Voice From Harper’s Ferry. He believed that southern accounts were biased, he felt compelled to give an account of the event from the raiders’ perspective. http://www.cafepress.com/gkcstore

The young black janitor who changed the world ... Vivien Thomas (1910-1985). In 1944, Hopkins' surgery chief, Dr. Alfred Blalock, successfully operated on the heart of a 9-pound child, a "blue baby." As Blalock prepared to make his historic incision, he looked around the operating room and asked, "Where's Vivien?" Blalock would not begin surgery until his janitor-turned-surgical assistant, Vivien Thomas, was there to guide the procedure. Prejudice long kept Thomas' crucial role…

The young black janitor who changed the world ... Vivien Thomas (1910-1985). In 1944, Hopkins' surgery chief, Dr. Alfred Blalock, successfully operated on the heart of a 9-pound child, a "blue baby." As Blalock prepared to make his historic incision, he looked around the operating room and asked, "Where's Vivien?" Blalock would not begin surgery until his janitor-turned-surgical assistant, Vivien Thomas, was there to guide the procedure. Prejudice long kept Thomas' crucial role…

Dr. May Edward Chinn (April 15, 1896 – December 1, 1980) was an African-American woman physician. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital Medical College and the first African-American woman to intern at Harlem Hospital. In her private practice, she provided care for patients who would not otherwise receive treatment due to racism or classism.

Dr. May Edward Chinn (April 15, 1896 – December 1, 1980) was an African-American woman physician. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital Medical College and the first African-American woman to intern at Harlem Hospital. In her private practice, she provided care for patients who would not otherwise receive treatment due to racism or classism.

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