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640 Fifth Ave. | The ballroom of the Vanderbilt mansion during Grace Wilson [Mrs. Cornelius III] Vanderbilt's occupancy.

Grand Salon, Cornelius Vanderbilt II house, 1894, at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street. Salon designed by Jules Allard et Fils.

'Rough Point' ~ the Duke estate in Newport, RI. First built by Frederick Vanderbilt, it was later sold to James B. Duke, who had Horace Trumbauer renovate the home. It was later inherited by Doris Duke, becoming one of her favorite homes.

Louis Comfort Tiffany Mansion (above) circa 1886 at the corner of 72nd Street and Madison Avenue designed by McKim, Mead & White.

Luscious: myLusciousLife.comfrom Luscious: myLusciousLife.com

Historical books - recommended reading list

NYC - Duke Mansion - 1009 Fifth Avenue

Charles M. Schwab house, Riverside Dr. at 74th St, New York City. Maurice Hebert, architect. Image from The American Architect, Nov. 4, 1905.

The Gilded Age Era: The William A. Clark Mansion, New York City Senator William A. Clark decided to move his business empire to New York City & felt that townhouses already standing were too shabby for him to live in, so he decided to show everyone how to build a true palace worth living in. Lord, Hewlett & Hull to drew up plans for a massive mansion occupying the corner of 960 Fifth Avenue, which would cost $7 million. Clark sent them to Henri Deglane in Paris for further embellishments.

Curbed NYfrom Curbed NY

Looking Back at Manhattan's Lost Gilded Age Mansions

Cornelius Vanderbilt II Mansion - demolished

vanderbilt 5th avenue homes picture | Grand Salon, Cornelius Vanderbilt II house, 1894, at Fifth Avenue and ...

The Breakers | Cornelius Vanderbilt II, Newport, RI. Pictured: The Arcade, in an Italian Renaissance style and contains a sculpted fireplace designed by Karl Bitter. The vaulted ceiling is hand-painted with a blue mural of garlands and cherubs covered with a diaper pattern applied in gold leaf. The arcade contains two 17th-century Italian chairs bearing the coat of arms of the Borghese and Barberini families.

Frederick William Vanderbilt, grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt hired McKim, Mead and White Architects to design this ca.1896 Gilded Age mansion in Hyde Park, NY