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John of Gaunt 1st Duke of Lancaster, son of King Edward lll of England. Husband of Katherine Swynford and father of Joan Beaufort. Joan married Sir Ralph Neville and became the ancestor of George Washington, on his mothers side.

Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster became the third wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, a son of King Edward III. Their descendants were members of the Beaufort family, which played a major role in the Wars of the Roses. Henry VII, who became King of England in 1485, derived his claim to the throne from his mother Lady Margaret Beaufort, who was a great-granddaughter of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford.

Philippa of Hainault (1314 - 1369). Wife of Edward III. Queen from 1328 - 1369. Mother of Edward The Black Prince, and John of Gaunt. Her marriage was supposedly very happy.

Blessed Margaret Pole pictured with her son, Cardinal Pole. My ancestor, Sir Edward Neville, was executed on the suspicion he backed Margaret's succession to the throne. She alone was the heir to the last of the Plantagenets. Edward and Margaret were cousins through sisters Isobel and Anne Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, the Kingmaker. Sir Edward's youngest son John Neville was my ancestor. Too young to inherit anything.

James 5th High Steward Scotland Stewart 1243 -1309 was the son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. He was a Guardian of Scotland. During the Wars of Scottish Independence, he submitted to King Edward I of England. However, he joined Sir William Wallace. After the defeat of Wallace at the Battle of Falkirk 1298 he joined Robert the Bruce. James Stewart's son Walter Stewart married Robert the Bruce's daughter, Marjorie Bruce. I'll count the "greats" back from me later!

Blanche of Lancaster, Duchess of Lancaster (25 March 1345 – 12 September 1368) was the first wife of John of Gaunt (son of Edward III) and the mother of Henry IV (Bolingbroke), who took the crown from Richard II

Joan Beaufort (c. 1404 - 15 July 1445) , was Queen Consort of the Kingdom of Scotland from 1424 to 1437, being married to James I of Scotland. She was a daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and Margaret Holland. Her paternal grandparents were John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and his mistress and later third wife Katherine Swynford. The Castle of Stirling had been conferred by James I, upon his English bride, Lady Joanna de Beaufort as her dowry.

Princess Joan of Acre (1272 - 1307). Daughter of King Edward I and Queen Eleanor of Castile. She married Gilbert de Clare and had four children. After his death she remarried Ralph de Monthermer and had four more children.

Henry II was notorious for his illicit relations with other men’s wives, and for having several illegitimate children. However, few records containing information about them have survived, and only records about the most infamous mistresses would have been written to start with. Henry II married Eleanor of Aquitaine in 1152, the same year Henry’s first recorded illegitimate son, Geoffrey Plantagenet Archbishop of York was born, details of his mother are unclear but her name is believed to…

Henry I's daughter: Matilda. Married at age 23 to 13 year old Geoffrey V Plantagenet and son of Fulk, King of Jerusalem, and their son was King Henry II

King Edward II (1307-1327). 18th great-grandfather of Queen Eliz II. House of Plantagenet. Reign: 20 yrs, 2 mos., 14 days. Successor: son, Edward III. He was appointed the 1st Prince of Wales by his father, King Edward I Longshanks. Considered incompetent, frivolous and unduly influenced by his "favourites", he was deposed by his wife Isabella & her lover Roger de Mortimer, and murdered in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire.

Henry II had Eleanor imprisoned for the next 16 years. In 1189, Henry died and Eleanor of Aquitaine's favorite son, Richard the Lionheart, became king (his older brother Henry had already died). Richard soon went away on the Third Crusade, leaving his mother as regent of England. Eleanor survived Richard and lived long into the reign of her youngest son, King John. Like his brother, King John respected his mother and heeded her advice so that even at the age of 77,

John Beaufort, 1st Marquess of Somerset & 1st Marquess of Dorset, later 1st Earl of Somerset,(1373 – 1410) was the 1st of 4 illegitimate (later legitimized) children of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, & his mistress Katherine Swynford, later his wife. John Beaufort & his wife Margaret, the daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent & Alice FitzAlan, had 6 children. He was an ancestor of the Tudor dynasty.

Excerpt: 'MARGARET POLE, Countess of Salisbury (1473-1541), was daughter of George Plantagenet, duke of Clarence, by his wife Isabel, daughter of Warwick the Kingmaker. She was born at Castle Farley, near Bath, in August 1473, and was married by Henry VII to Sir Richard Pole, son of Sir Geoffrey Pole, whose wife, Edith St. John, was half-sister of the king's mother, Margaret Beaufort.' The last Plantagenet, she was hideously executed May 27,1541. Read More...

Henry 'Bolingbroke' was the son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Bolingbroke didn't make it a secret that he thought Richard II was a lousy king and unfit to rule. Richard banished him, and then stole his inheritance (and his title) when Gaunt died. Henry returned to claim his estates, saying that he just wanted back what was rightfully his. But he quite quickly changed his story -- he wanted to be king. He deposed Richard II and became Henry IV.

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John of Gaunt, the Last Medieval Knight. A review of Norman Cantor's The Last Knight.

John of Gaunt, son of Edward III. Was my 18th g-grandfather.

Mary Queen of Scots, aged 19, in white mourning to mark the loss of three members of her immediate family within a period of 18 months. Her father-in-law Henry II died in July 1559; her mother Mary of Guise died in Scotland in June 1560; and in December of the same year her husband Francis II died. Mary, no longer Queen of France, returned to Scotland in August 1561. Wearing white was the official sign of mourning worn by women of royal blood or high-ranking courtiers.

A 16th century miniature of Elizabeth of York. She was the daughter of a king (Edward IV), the sister of a king (Edward V), the niece of a king (Richard III), the wife of a king (Henry VII), the mother of a king (Henry VIII), and the grandmother to a king (Edward VI) and two queens (Mary I and Elizabeth I).