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    "Mammatus clouds are most often associated with the anvil cloud and severe thunderstorms. They often extend from the base of a cumulonimbus, but may also be found under altocumulus, altostratus, stratocumulus, and cirrus clouds, as well as volcanic ash clouds. When occurring in cumulonimbus, mammatus are often indicative of a particularly strong storm or perhaps even a tornadic storm."

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    Astronomers Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell, said: 'These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts. 'In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud. 'When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud may form. via Claire Bates, #Roll_Cloud #NASA #dailymail 'Roll clouds may actually have air circulating along the long horizontal axis of the cloud.'