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In 1921, the Greenwood Avenue district of Tulsa, Oklahoma was an exemplar of what a motivated African American middle class could accomplish. Dubbed, "The Negro Wall Street," Greenwood Avenue was populated by successful African American families, businesses, hospitals and churches. All this would change on May 31.

MadameNoirefrom MadameNoire

The First Black Girl Scout Troop

In 1917, five years after its inception, the first troop of African American girls was formed. This photo, taken in the late 1930s, is of the first African-American troop in the Dixie Region, which covered the Southern states. Source: Girlscouts.org

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass and his grandson Joseph. Photo: Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

A country divided: Stunning photographs capture the lives of ordinary Americans during segregation in the Jim Crow south

Separated: This image shows a neon sign, also in Mobile, Alabama, marking a separate entrance for African Americans encouraged by the Jim Crow laws - article and more pictures

Jane Bolin (1908 - 2007) was the first African American female judge in the United States. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928. She was the first black woman to graduate from Yale University School of Law and the first to be admitted to the New York City Bar Association.

African American History

Saint Elmo Brady (December 22, 1884 - December 25, 1966) was the first African American to obtain a Ph.D. degree in chemistry in the United States, which he earned in 1916 from the University of Illinois. He taught at Tuskegee, Fisk, Howard and Tougaloo, and was the first African American admitted to Phi Lambda Upsilon, the chemistry honor society. #TodayInBlackHistory

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many dangers and…

The Brotherhood | 1913 Beta Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha, Howard University, 1913. Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) was the first Inter-Collegiate Black Greek Letter fraternity.