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    English: arms of the Carter of Castle Martin, ref: The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales; comprising a registry of armorial bearings from the earliest to the present time. by Burke, Bernard, Sir, 1814-1892. Crest—Lions, rampant, combatant. Carter is an occupational name meaning "a maker or driver of carts". FAMILY MOTTO: VICTRIX PATIENTIA DURIS (Latin) - meaning "patience is victorious in hardship".

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    • Patricia Henderson

      English: arms of the Carter of Castle Martin, ref: The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales; comprising a registry of armorial bearings from the earliest to the present time. by Burke, Bernard, Sir, 1814-1892. Crest—Lions, rampant, combatant. Carter is an occupational name meaning "a maker or driver of carts". FAMILY MOTTO: VICTRIX PATIENTIA DURIS (Latin) - meaning "patience is victorious in hardship".

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