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  • Jonathan Aluzas

    Animal lovers will love all the James Herriot books. As a kid, I read them many times. Just last month, I dug them out of an old box in the garage and re-read them. They're just as charming, heartfelt, and transportive as they were when I was a kid. This is light reading, but the kind of magical light reading where you brew up a pot of tea, wrap yourself in a blanket on a rainy weekend, and disappear into the words until the workweek starts Monday morning. Pure bliss.

  • Kelly Swain

    One of my favorite books!

  • Gina Burlovich

    "All Creatures Great and Small" ~ James Herriot.. Great book =]

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