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Dr. Franz Alfred Six (12 August 1909 in Mannheim - 9 July 1975 in Bolzano) was a Nazi official who rose to the rank of SS-Brigadeführer. He was appointed by Reinhard Heydrich to head department Amt VII, Written Records of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA). In 1940, he was appointed to direct state police operations in an occupied Great Britain following invasion.

Johann Baptist Albin Rauter (Feb 4, 1895 – March 25, 1949) was a high-ranking Austrian (from 1939, German) Nazi war criminal. He was the highest SS and Police Leader in the Netherlands and the leading security and police officer during the period of 1940-1945. He reported directly to the Nazi SS-chief, Himmler, and in the second instance to the Nazi governor of the Netherlands, Arthur Seyss-Inquart. He was convicted in the Netherlands of crimes against humanity and executed by firing squad.

Wilhelm Hosenfeld (2 May 1895 – 13 August 1952), was a German Army officer who rose to the rank of Hauptmann by the end of the war. He helped to hide or rescue several Poles, including Jews, in Nazi-occupied Poland, and is perhaps most remembered for helping Polish-Jewish pianist and composer Władysław Szpilman to survive, hidden, in the ruins of Warsaw during the last months of 1944. He died in Soviet captivity on 13 August 1952, from injury possibly sustained during torture.

Karl Herman Frank hanging from the neck in Prague, 1946, for his role in organizing the massacres of the people of the Czech villages of Lidice and Ležáky. He was the Higher SS and Police Leader and Secretary of State of the Reich Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.

John R. Mott Though perhaps less well known today than the others on our list, Mott was an influential evangelist and longtime YMCA official, who shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946. He and a colleague were supposedly offered free passage on the Titanic by a White Star Line official interested in their work but declined and instead took the more humble liner Lapland. According to a biography by C. Howard Hopkins, when they reached New York and heard about the disaster, “It is said that the…

Auschwitz. Family of Slovak Jewess Lili Jacob (her aunt Tauba with her four children) awaiting Selection at the ramp in Birkenau. During the selection all were send to gas chambers. The transport from the ghetto in Beregszasz in Hungary left on May 17, 1944 and arrived on May 27, 1945. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

Otto Kümmel (1874-1952) In 1940, Otto Kümmel, general director of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin (Berlin State Museums), was commissioned by Goebbels, Minister for Propaganda, to compile a list of artworks that had left Germany since the 16th century, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars and after the Treaty of Versailles. They were to be "returned" to the German Reich.