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"Give Me a . and a ?" at the end of a lesson.  Students have to write a quick statement about what they've learned and question they could ask a 'buddy' about their learning.

"Give Me a . and a ?" at the end of a lesson. Students have to write a quick statement about what they've learned and question they could ask a 'buddy' about their learning.

Print a thin strip of questions for students to glue in their notebook and answer. Beats trying to copy all the questions from the board (or not writing them down at all!)

Print a thin strip of questions for students to glue in their notebook and answer. Beats trying to copy all the questions from the board (or not writing them down at all!)

Close reading is a challenging technique to implement in the classroom, as it requires a delicate balance. I've tried to make close reading instruction easier with the help of these two no-prep close reading resources. They're ready for you to use right away, and they come with text dependent questions. Get all of the details about what these resources include and how you can implement them in your classroom in this post!

No-Prep Close Reading

Close reading is a challenging technique to implement in the classroom, as it requires a delicate balance. I've tried to make close reading instruction easier with the help of these two no-prep close reading resources. They're ready for you to use right away, and they come with text dependent questions. Get all of the details about what these resources include and how you can implement them in your classroom in this post!

Divide the inside of a file folder into boxes that are slightly larger than small sticky notes. Write students' names in the boxes in alphabetical order, one name per box. Whenever you want to make a note about a student's progress, jot the information on a sticky note and then place it in the appropriate box. Periodically move the sticky notes to students' assessment folders. You'll have valuable information at your fingertips when it's time to prepare report cards.

Divide the inside of a file folder into boxes that are slightly larger than small sticky notes. Write students' names in the boxes in alphabetical order, one name per box. Whenever you want to make a note about a student's progress, jot the information on a sticky note and then place it in the appropriate box. Periodically move the sticky notes to students' assessment folders. You'll have valuable information at your fingertips when it's time to prepare report cards.

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