The first ancient artifact constituting tangible evidence of the existence of the city of Bethlehem, which is mentioned in the Bible, was recently discovered in Jerusalem.

The first ancient artifact constituting tangible evidence of the existence of the city of Bethlehem, which is mentioned in the Bible, was recently discovered in Jerusalem.

According to ancient classical authors, the Phoenicians were a people who occupied the coast of the Levant (eastern Mediterranean). Their major cities were Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, and Arwad. All were fiercely independent, rival cities and, unlike the neighboring inland states, the Phoenicians represented a confederation of maritime traders rather than a defined country

THE FIRST DOCUMENTED INSTANCE OF THE NAME "ISRAEL" IN THE HISTORICAL RECORD IS AT THE CAIRO MUSEUM IN EGYPT

A team of archaeologists from the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) has discovered a spectacular tomb containing more than eighty individuals of different ages. This discovery – provisionally dated to around 1000 years ago – was made at the site of Pachacamac, which is currently under review for UNESCO World Heritage status.

According to ancient classical authors, the Phoenicians were a people who occupied the coast of the Levant (eastern Mediterranean). Their major cities were Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, and Arwad. All were fiercely independent, rival cities and, unlike the neighboring inland states, the Phoenicians represented a confederation of maritime traders rather than a defined country

Asherah was the name of a Canaanite goddess. Part of the Canaanite pantheon, she became in Semitic mythology, a mother goddess. Her name is attested to in a number of ancient Near Eastern sources including the Khirbet el-Qom and Kuntillet Ajrud inscriptions, where the phrase ‘YHVH (and) his asherah’ is detected. The Bible mentions her at least forty times.

A team of archaeologists from the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) has discovered a spectacular tomb containing more than eighty individuals of different ages. This discovery – provisionally dated to around 1000 years ago – was made at the site of Pachacamac, which is currently under review for UNESCO World Heritage status.

Archaeologist Sarah Parcak says she has discovered thousands of ancient sites in Egypt, from pyramids to a detailed street plan of the city of Tanis, an A-to-Z of the region’s northern capital – all thanks to images from satellites orbiting 400 miles above the Earth. The infra-red pictures are capable of tracing structures buried deep in the sand. “It just shows us,” she adds, “how easy it is to underestimate both the size and scale of past human settlements.”

Asherah was the name of a Canaanite goddess. Part of the Canaanite pantheon, she became in Semitic mythology, a mother goddess. Her name is attested to in a number of ancient Near Eastern sources including the Khirbet el-Qom and Kuntillet Ajrud inscriptions, where the phrase ‘YHVH (and) his asherah’ is detected. The Bible mentions her at least forty times.

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey

Archaeologist Sarah Parcak says she has discovered thousands of ancient sites in Egypt, from pyramids to a detailed street plan of the city of Tanis, an A-to-Z of the region’s northern capital – all thanks to images from satellites orbiting 400 miles above the Earth. The infra-red pictures are capable of tracing structures buried deep in the sand. “It just shows us,” she adds, “how easy it is to underestimate both the size and scale of past human settlements.”

Black Canaan: The first cities, the Amorite invaders

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey

Sue Tuttle | Ancient artifacts are the inspiration behind these pit-fired clay vessels

Black Canaan: The first cities, the Amorite invaders

✮ Close up of excavations in the ancient biblical city Meggiddo, Israel

Sue Tuttle | Ancient artifacts are the inspiration behind these pit-fired clay vessels

Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world’s oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not the gods.

✮ Close up of excavations in the ancient biblical city Meggiddo, Israel

Norwegian archaeologists have solved one of the great puzzles of the Roman Empire: Why was the vibrant city of Palmyra located in the middle of the Syrian Desert?