Discover and save creative ideas

    A team of archaeologists led by Stephen Houston has made a new discovery at the Maya archaeological site in El Zotz, Guatemala, uncovering a pyramid believed to celebrate the Maya sun god.

    3y Saved to Archaeology
    • Heritage Daily

      A team of archaeologists led by Stephen Houston has made a new discovery at the Maya archaeological site in El Zotz, Guatemala, uncovering a pyramid believed to celebrate the Maya sun god.

    • Емилия Евтимова

      A tracing of an image found at the El Zotz archaeological site in Guatemala depicts the Maya sun god

    People also love

    Mayan painted clay statue from the Tik'al archaeological site. Figure of a God from the burial site of Yax Nuun Ayiin I.

    Maya Hieroglyphs are carved on the side of a tall stela at the site of Quirigua Guatemala


    Maya Woman Figurine. This modern reproduction of an ancient Maya figurine occupies a nicho in a colonial home in San Cristobal de las Casas Chiapas Mexico

    Glyphs carved into a tiny alabaster jar have led archaeologists to conclude that the tomb in Guatemala where the jar was found belonged to one of the greatest queens of the Classic Maya civilization, known as Lady K'abel. (via NBC News; photo via El Peru-Waka Regional Archaeological Project)

    Ancient Mayan wall Frescos from a room in the Maya archaeological site Bonampak in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

    Seen for the first time in centuries, a 1,500-year-old tomb comes to light via a tiny camera lowered into a Maya pyramid at Mexico's Palenque archaeological site in April. The intact, blood-red funeral chamber offers insight into the ancient city's early history, experts say.

    Bonampak - Maya archaeology site - Chiapas, Mexico

    The enormous Olmec helmeted heads. The Olmec are now recognized as the predecessors of the Maya and Aztec civilisations. Photograph taken in 1942.

    Pot with jaguar and fishes Central Maya area Late Classic Maya 600-900 CE Earthenware, via Flickr.

    Mesoamerica – Past and Present

    Shifts in exchange patterns provide a new perspective on the fall of inland Maya centers in Mesoamerica approximately 1,000 years ago.

    A team of archaeologists from the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) has discovered a spectacular tomb containing more than eighty individuals of different ages. This discovery – provisionally dated to around 1000 years ago – was made at the site of Pachacamac, which is currently under review for UNESCO World Heritage status.

    Archaeologists have identified examples of the earliest use of steel in the British Isles from a site in East Lothian. The site, an Iron Age hill fort known as Broxmouth, was excavated in the 1970s, however the discoveries are only now being published. #archaeology

    Carving from the sanctuary of Yazılıkaya (Turkish - Inscribed rock) nearby the ancient city of Hattusha. This carving shows the god Sharrumma escorting one of the Hittite kings possibly after his death. The site was used from the 15th Century BC though most carvings are from the 13th Century BC. The site was declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 1986. .....archaeology prehistoric

    Archaeologist Sarah Parcak says she has discovered thousands of ancient sites in Egypt, from pyramids to a detailed street plan of the city of Tanis, an A-to-Z of the region’s northern capital – all thanks to images from satellites orbiting 400 miles above the Earth. The infra-red pictures are capable of tracing structures buried deep in the sand. “It just shows us,” she adds, “how easy it is to underestimate both the size and scale of past human settlements.”

    The Grand Circle Just as every point along the equator is 6,215 miles from both the North and South Poles, every point along this circle of ancient sites is 6,215 miles from two axis points on Earth. Many ancient sites such as the Ziggurut of Ur, the Pyramids of Giza, and the cities of Petra and Persepolis lie along this 'grand circle'

    Statuette of a Standing Woman Period: Probably Dynasty 1 Date: ca. 3100–2900 B.C. Geography: Country of Origin Egypt, Northern Upper Egypt, Abydos (Umm el-Qaab, Tell el-Manshiya, others), Osiris temple Medium: Ivory

    Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world’s oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not the gods.

    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. #archaeology #archeology #archaeological