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Britain is a wealth of treasure; it glitters not with gold, but with stories. It holds tales of the mundane, the horrific, and the mesmerizing. ‘History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce’ – Karl Marx The human species is still very young, yet we have expanded to every corner of the earth like a chemical reaction. It’s the human big bang; we have made small steps and giant leaps, only to be confronted with the same issues, presented as innovative and new, a ‘new econ...

Britain is a wealth of treasure; it glitters not with gold, but with stories. It holds tales of the mundane, the horrific, and the mesmerizing. ‘History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce’ – Karl Marx The human species is still very young, yet we have expanded to every corner of the earth like a chemical reaction. It’s the human big bang; we have made small steps and giant leaps, only to be confronted with the same issues, presented as innovative and new, a ‘new econ...

13th C. BCE. Winged figures are rare in the Hittite pantheon. A bronze and silver winged figure with a gold cap, kilt, and upturned shoes, holding a broken rod. The best reference for the figurine comes from the open-air sanctuary at Yazilikaya, in central Anatolia, where images of the Hittite gods were carved in the rock walls of its natural chambers. According to an inscription of a similar figure, he would be the god Pirinki/ar, a deity associated with the winged divinity Ishtar.

Gold rhyton, Thracian treasure .

Neck from a vessel depicting the goddess Hathor flanked by felines, late Dynasty XIX–Third Intermediate Period (ca. 1188–712 b.c.) From Bubastis Silver, gold

A Head of Osiris from a Large Composite Statuette H. 23.2 cm. Wood, stucco, gold, bronze, glassEgypt, Late Period

A Rare Gold Statuette of the Goddess Mut Amulet: Gold.Egypt, Late Period, 25th Dynasty, ca. 700 B.C.

Gold dagger, from the tomb of King Tutankhamun, Carter # 256dd; 31.9 cm; blade 20.1 cm; Egyptian Museum, Cairo. Two similar daggers were found in Tutankhamun's tomb, one with a gold blade (in image 26) and the other with an iron blade. Gold daggers were reserved for the nobility, but bronze or copper daggers were used from the Old Kingdom on in Egypt.

First high-quality genome sequence allows comparison with human, Denisovan DNA The most complete sequence to date of the Neanderthal genome, using DNA extracted from a woman’s toe bone that dates back 50,000 years, reveals a long history of interbreeding among at least four different types of early humans living in Europe and Asia at that time, according to University of California, Berkeley, scientists.

Sunlight adaptation in region of Neanderthal genome found in up to 65 percent of modern East Asian population. With the Neanderthal genome now published, for the first time, scientists have a rich new resource of comparative evolution. For example, recently, scientists have shown that humans and Neanderthals once interbreed, with the accumulation of elements of Neanderthal DNA found in up to 5 percent in modern humans.

Howard Carter opening the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in 1924

A second season of excavations at Britain’s biggest Iron Age hill-fort has uncovered remains of Roman weaponry, and the site of the first “ham stone” house. Archaeologists are slowly piecing together a picture of what life was like in Britain’s largest hill-fort, after a second season of excavations. The project, at Ham Hill in Somerset, is the most intensive excavation of the Iron Age fort ever undertaken, and involves researchers from both Cambridge and Cardiff universities.

Perfume bottle in the shape of a hes-vase inlaid with the figure of a princess Period: New Kingdom, Amarna Period Dynasty: Dynasty 18 Reign: reign of Akhenaten Date: ca. 1353–1336 B.C. Geography: Egypt

Kneeling statue of Bay [Egyptian]. The completed statuette depicts a kneeling man holding a stela inscribed with a hymn to the sun. item (66.99.94,2009.253) via Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Coffin of Irtirutja Period: Macedonian-Ptolemaic Period Date: 332–30 B.C. Geography: Egypt, Northern Upper Egypt, Akhmim (Khemmis, Panopolis), Maspero 1885–1886

A fractured skull and a thigh bone hacked in half — finds of damaged human bones along with axes, spears, clubs and shields confirm that the bog at Alken Enge was the site of violent conflict.

Standing female worshiper, ca. 2600-2500 BC From Nippur, Sumerian culture Limestone, inlaid with shell and lapis lazulu

Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 8th century B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu, IRAQ) Culture: Assyrian 1958, excavated by Sir Max Mallowan on behalf of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq and the Metropolitan Museum of Art; ceded to the British School of Archaeology in Iraq in the division of finds; acquired by the Museum in 1959, purchased from British School of Archaeology in Iraq

cosmetic tray with sphinx, iron period ca. 6th–5th century B.C., geography: Egypt or Iran

Female head Neo-Assyrian,ca 8th-7th cent.BC Mesopotamia,Nimrud Ivory Metropolitan Museum

The Potteries museum and art gallery has scooped a £40,000 heritage grant to stage its largest ever exhibition on the world’s biggest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver.