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The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was the only all African-American, all-female battalion during World War II. Called the Six Triple Eight, the women moved mountains of mail that clogged warehouses in Birmingham for American service members and civilians in the mid-1940s.

Women's Army Corps Charity Adams Earley enlisted in the U.S. Army's Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) in July 1942. She was the first African American woman to be an officer in the WAAC. Later she served as the commanding officer and battalion commander of the first battalion of African American women (6888th Central Postal Direction) to serve overseas during WWII (in England). They helped soldiers get mail during World War II.

NPR.orgfrom NPR.org

African-American Faces Of The Civil War

African American Faces during the Civil War

Eugene Jacques Bullard (1919) The first African-American combat pilot, was one of 200 Americans who flew for France in World War I.

Stagecoach Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service.

Over the years Eartha White operated a department store, a taxi service, and a steam laundry, and was licensed as a real estate broker, a census taker and a social worker. Known as the Angel of Mercy for her lifetime of humanitarian and civic service, Eartha White served the sick during the Spanish American War, was the only woman member of a sixty-member inter-racial War Camp Community Service Conference during World War I, served as a member of President Wilson's White House Conference…

BuzzFeedfrom BuzzFeed

34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Roger Arliner Young (1889–1964) was a zoologist and biologist and the first African-American woman to receive a doctorate in zoology. During her long career she studied radiation, paramecium, and hydration and dehydration of living cells. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Barney Ford was born a slave in Virginia. At the age of twenty-fire, he escaped and began a successful career in a variety of entrepreneurial ventures.By 1860, he was living in Denver and became a prosperous tycoon in the hotel, restaurant, and barbershop businesses, earning the nickname the "Black Baron of Colorado." Throughout the Civil War, he gave financial assistance, food, and jobs to escaped and free African Americans.

One Dies, Get Another: Convict Leasing in the American South, 1866-1928 - Matthew J. Mancini - Google Books. Convict leasing was a system of penal labor practiced in the Southern United States, beginning with the emancipation of slaves at the end of the American Civil War in 1865, peaking around 1880, and officially ending in the last state, Alabama, in 1928. It persisted in various forms until World War II.

First Lieutenant William Dominick Matthews, of the U.S. Colored Light Artillery, In addition, Matthews helped recruit many black soldiers. Before the Civil War, Matthews ran a boarding house in Leavenworth, Kansas, that was part of the underground railroad. The Leavenworth businessman soon was appointed captain, the highest ranking African American officer in the regiment. More extensive historical story at the link!