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    The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was the only all African-American, all-female battalion during World War II. Called the Six Triple Eight, the women moved mountains of mail that clogged warehouses in Birmingham for American service members and civilians in the mid-1940s.

    2y

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    • Jason Porter

      Members of the US Army 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion march in Rouen, 27 May 1945. The 6888th was the first battalion of African American women to serve overseas

    • Julie Dash

      The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, the African American women who served overseas during WWII

    • Stacey Coleman

      Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d’Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake (Rouen, France). May 27, 1945 The 6888th Postal Battalion was an all female, all black unit responsible for sorting every piece of mail sent to US troops in the European theater.

    • LaKase Perry

      African-American members of the US Army 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion parading in honor of Joan d’Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake.Rouen, France, 27 May 1945 | World War II

    • Melvin

      African Americn women, members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake. May 27, 1945.Pfc. Stedman. 111-SC-42644

    • Mitmunk

      Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake. May 27, 1945. The postal battalion was the first all-African-American, all-female unit to serve overseas in World War II. http://edition.cnn.com/2009/US/02/25/postal.battalion/ From the collection of US National Archives.

    • American Public University System

      6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion - In 1945, these 855 enlisted African-American women were given six months to sort through three airplane hangars full of undelivered letters. They got the job done in just three months and were redeployed to France to keep the mail moving to soldiers. *Photo credit: courtesy of the National Archives

    • Audrey Wilson

      Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d’Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake (Rouen, France). May 27, 1945 The 6888th Postal Battalion was an all female, all black unit responsible for sorting every piece of mail sent to US troops in the European theater.  Letters from home were vital to maintaining morale, yet when the 6888th first arrived in Europe, letters were stacked to the ceiling of their temporar

    • Fredrica Foster

      African American WACs (U.S. Army), World War II by Black History Album, via Flickr

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