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Martha Raye (1916 - 1994), American comedienne and USO worker, She is the only woman buried in the Special Forces cemetery at Fort Bragg. Hollywood just doesn't make 'em like this any more. During WWII, Korea and Vietnam, she traveled extensively to entertain the American troops. Martha was made an honorary Green Beret and visited US Army Special Forces in Vietnam without fanfare.She was affectionately known by the Green Berets as "Colonel Maggie." #WWII

German world war II land battleship Landkreuzer P-1000 Ratte Designed as early as the year 1942, the p-1000 was intended to be a land battleship. The monster was intended to be an astounding 35 meters long, 14 meters wide, and 11 meters tall. These are the exact specifications in cooperation between Porsche, Henschel & Son, and MAN SE company.

General Douglas MacArthur, US General during World War II,[35] Manila Lodge No. 1, 1936, Philippines -Brother

Audie Murphy During twenty-seven months in action in the European Theatre he received the Medal of Honor, the US military's highest award for valor, along with 32 additional U.S. and foreign awards (medals, ribbons, citations, badges) including five awards from France and one from Belgium. He is the most decorated soldier of WWII. The movie "To Hell and Back (1955)" is based on his experience during the conflict.

Don Knotts joined the U.S. Army at age 19 and went on active duty on June 21, 1943. He served for the duration of Wolrd War II and was discharged on January 6, 1946 with the rank of Technician Grade 5, which was the equivalent of a Corporal. He was awarded the WWII Victory Medal, Philippine Liberation Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (with 4 bronze service stars), Army Good Conduct Medal, Marksman Badge (with Carbine Bar) and Honorable Service Lapel Pin.

Jimmy Stewart...WWII.....Did you know, He was a pilot in the USAF, had a noted military career and was a World War II and Vietnam War veteran, who rose to the rank of Brigadier General in the United States Air Force Reserve. See, some actors are real heroes.

Actor Russell Johnson, best known as "The Professor" on Gilligan's Island, served in the US Army Air Force during WWII. He flew 44 combat missions as a bombardier in B-25 bombers. In March 1945, he and two other B-25s were shot down in the Philippines. He broke both his ankles and the radioman next to him was killed. Johnson earned a Purple Heart, among other honors. He was honorably discharged and later served in the Army Reserve. He used his GI Bill to fund his acting lessons.

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (26 January 1880 – 5 April 1964) was an American general and field marshal of the Philippine Army. He was a Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II.

TONY CURTIS (aka Bernard Schwartz) serving in World War II. Before he reinvented himself as a Hollywood star, Curtis served in the U.S. Navy during WWII. He was seventeen years old when Japan surrendered to the Allied Forces in Toyko bay, where he was stationed. He witnessed the historic signing ceremony aboard his ship, the U.S.S. Proteus.

Lyndon Johnson (36th President of the United States) Branch: United States Navy - Job: - Rank: Lieutenant Commander - Unit: - Service: WWII - Notes: Silver Star

James Stewart, a Best Actor winner in 1941 for The Philadelphia Story, was one of the first major stars to enlist. During World War II, he'd fly at least 20 combat missions in Europe.

Clark Gable (1901-1960) Major US Army Air Corps 1942-44 WW II. "Although beyond draft age, Clark Gable enlisted as a private. Assigned to OCS he excelled and received a commission. He flew five combat mission as an observer/gunner in a B-17earning a Distinguished Flying Cross and an Air Medal. On his fourth mission, a 20mm shell cut the heel from his boot. His discharge was signed by Captain Ronald Reagan."