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Foursquarefrom Foursquare

Washington, D.C.

Eva Beatrice Dykes became the first Black woman in the US to meet the requirements for a Ph.D., in 1921, at Radcliffe College.

Rankerfrom Ranker

Political Wives Who Overshadowed Their Husbands

Eleanor Roosevelt

Feminist and revolutionary Qiu Jin was born in 1875 in China. She was vocal about women's rights and pressed for better access to education for women. At the time it was still customary for women to have their feet bound at the age of five, rendering women crippled and severely dependent on others. Qiu Jin encouraged women to resist oppression by their families and by the government, and to gain financial independence through education. She was beheaded by the authorities at the age of 31.

Babblefrom Babble

10 Female American Heroes Your Daughter Should Know About

Eleanor Roosevelt took advantage of her role as First Lady and spoke out about children's and women's rights, as well as human rights. Instead of staying in the back, she held press conferences where she was a voice for racial discrimination and the poor. She is now considered one of the first public officials to publicize important issues through the mass media.

esquire.comfrom esquire.com

The 75 Greatest Women of All Time

Eleanor Roosevelt

Elizabeth Blackwell was rejected by 19+ medical schools but was finally accepted by Geneva Medical College in NY. She graduated on January 23, 1849 to become the first female doctor in U.S. history.

Theodore Roosevelt in his Rough Riders uniform with his signature blue polka-dotted scarf. [Colorized History]

Four presidents (one sitting, one future, and two former), pay their respects at Eleanor Roosevelt's funeral. Hyde Park, NY - November 10, 1962.

the Guardianfrom the Guardian

Hidden histories: the first black people photographed in Britain – in pictures

African Choir, 1891-93. Mrs. Paul Xiniwe (née Ndwanya) of the African Choir, London, 1891. Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Ghosts of DCfrom Ghosts of DC

Abraham Lincoln in Color (1865

Abraham Lincoln

Born in 1884, humanitarian, civil rights activist, and former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the most influential woman in American history. Throughout the Great Depression and World War II—and afterward—she ceaselessly worked to better the lives of all, and her achievements still resonate globally today.

Jeanine McIntosh Menze holds the distinction of becoming the first African-American female in the United States Coast Guard to earn the Coast Guard Aviation designation. At the time of her graduation, she was the first African-American female aviator in the history of the U.S. Coast Guard.