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    • Sandi Hughey

      "[Our lab uses] a desktop inkjet printer, but instead of using ink, we’re using cells. — Anthony Atala Synopsis Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala's young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage. Talk recorded 3 March 2011."

    • Nancy Bridget

      Eurozone crisis causes aid cuts to poor, report says

    • TES Clean Air Systems

      3D Printing a Human Kidney: "[Our lab uses] a desktop inkjet printer, but instead of using ink, we’re using cells." — Anthony Atala

    More from this board

    Gloves turn gestures into speech: Ukrainian students built a set of electronic gloves to translate movement from signing into signals that a computer converts into speech. Cool!

    Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrated an "early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney." Wow.

    Researchers have found that twisted light can carry 2.5 terabits of data (more than 66 DVDs) per second. This can "vastly boost the data-carrying capacity in wi-fi and optical fibres." Cool!

    Underwater robots will join the search for Amelia Earhart's plane.

    IBM's supercomputer, Sequoia, deemed the "world's fastest." It is capable of "calculating in one hour what otherwise would take 6.7 billion people using hand calculators 320 years to complete if they worked non-stop."

    Freshly-made pizza vending machines to come to the U.S. Yes, pizza vending machines.

    Imagine using cotton t-shirts as a way to store energy for your cell-phone. Fashion of the future?

    IBM researchers have successfully stored a single data bit in only 12 atoms.

    Short sections of DNA are being used as rewritable data "bits" in living cells.

    The air-powered car, a project of Tata Motors and Motor Development International.

    Simulator scares teens into being better drivers by showing how dangerous distracted driving can be.

    Stanford University scientists have invented a light-powered bionic eye, which has helped some patients to see.

    Cool technology: Two blind men have their vision partially restored after surgery to fit pioneering eye implants.

    Self-driving cars with laser sight.

    Not necessarily about robots, but fun technology in general: MIT students turn building into game of Tetris.

    The robots--they have learned how to feel. Help your robot celebrate its first expression of emotions by joyously crying, or frustrated crying, or bitter weeping. (Does not come with motivational advice or words of wisdom for robo-angst.)

    The mechanical innards (or book shelf with things on it) of the Robot Supply Store.

    It's a robot! It's a calculator! It holds your pencils!

    Make a waddling robot! (Not to be thrown in lake or bodies of water. Do not feed bread.)

    Build a bubble-blowing robot to blow bubbles with. (A great activity for bubble enthusiasts.)

    This metal robot detects other metal friends.

    This robot can move. (You also can buy it.)

    The environmentally-friendly robot.

    Build this solar-powered robot, and get a glimpse of robotic immortality (unless it's cloudy).