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LIFE magazine's best photos - Telegraph

As a new BBC Four documentary examines the story of LIFE magazine, we look back at some of their finest photographs.
Jane Escoffier
Jane Escoffier • 1 year ago

Navy Chief Petty Officer Graham Jackson had played the accordion often for Franklin D. Roosevelt during the polio-stricken president's frequent visits to the spa at Warm Springs, Ga. He was scheduled to play for him again on April 12, 1945, the day Roosevelt died at the LIttle White House in Warm Springs. Instead, the officer found himself leading the funeral procession the next day, tears streaming down his face. By Ed Clark.

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The last photograph of President Franklin Roosevelt, taken at Warm Springs, GA by Nicholas Robbins for Elizabeth Shoumatoff. FDR died the following day. April 11, 1945.

Roosevelt, Franklin D.

1945 - F.D. Roosevelt had died. Ed Clark drove to cover the news but found swarms of photographers trying to get the best view of FDR's coffin. Clark heard one of Roosevelt's favorite hymns Goin'Home being played on an accordion. He snapped a shot of Navy bandsman Gordon Jackson with tears streaming down his face as he played. No one else had seen what Clark had seen, and his dramatic photograph became the symbol of a nation in grief. This photo took up an entire page in the next issue of LIFE.

President Franklin Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and family

President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Young Franklin D. Roosevelt

Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt Fishing at Camp David - 1943

Franklin Roosevelt in a portrait dated February 3, 1911, a few days after his 29th birthday.

This is a great shot of FDR. Looks like he might have been in his twenties or thirties.

President  Roosevelt signing the declaration of war on Japan, Dec. 8, 1941.

President Franklin Roosevelt at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on June 11, 1944. L-R: General Douglas Mac Arthur; President Roosevelt; Admiral Chester Nimitz; and Admiral William Taft Leahy.