Black King Amenemhat III built the Black pyramid during the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (2055-1650 BC). It is one of the five remaining of the original eleven at Dahshur in Egypt.

Black King Amenemhat III built the Black pyramid during the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (2055-1650 BC). It is one of the five remaining of the original eleven at Dahshur in Egypt.

Susa, capital of Elam, in modern-day Iran. Susa is one of the oldest cities in the world. Excavations have established the existence of urban structures about 4000 BCE.   http://www.iranchamber.com/history/susa/susa.php

Susa, capital of Elam, in modern-day Iran. Susa is one of the oldest cities in the world. Excavations have established the existence of urban structures about 4000 BCE. http://www.iranchamber.com/history/susa/susa.php

QANTIR, ANCIENT PI-RAMESSE. the ancient site of Ramesses II's great capital (Ramesses the Great, 1279-1213 BC 19th Dynasty) Pop.300,000, 6.9 sq. miles. The city had previously served as a summer palace under Seti I (c. 1290 BC - 1279 BC) and may have been originally founded by Ramesses I (c. 1292-1290 BC). The entire city was moved lock stock and barrel to Tanis, 30km away, when the Nile tributary it was on dried up during the 21st Dynasty period. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi-Ramesses

QANTIR, ANCIENT PI-RAMESSE. the ancient site of Ramesses II's great capital (Ramesses the Great, 1279-1213 BC 19th Dynasty) Pop.300,000, 6.9 sq. miles. The city had previously served as a summer palace under Seti I (c. 1290 BC - 1279 BC) and may have been originally founded by Ramesses I (c. 1292-1290 BC). The entire city was moved lock stock and barrel to Tanis, 30km away, when the Nile tributary it was on dried up during the 21st Dynasty period. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi-Ramesses

The excavation of a 4,000-year-old temple in northern Peru reveals an ancient mural in red and white.

The excavation of a 4,000-year-old temple in northern Peru reveals an ancient mural in red and white.

This image was created about 400 years after the Avaris hands were deposited. It shows the chopped-off hands of enemy soldiers being prepared for Ramses III, a pharaoh of Egypt, after a successful campaign.

Grisly Ancient Practice: Photos Reveal 'Gold of Valor'

This image was created about 400 years after the Avaris hands were deposited. It shows the chopped-off hands of enemy soldiers being prepared for Ramses III, a pharaoh of Egypt, after a successful campaign.

Hebrew University Professor Ehud Netzer reported on May 8, 2007 that he had discovered the tomb of Herod, above tunnels and water pools at a flattened site halfway up the hill to Herodium, 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) south of Jerusalem, at the precise location given by Josephus in his writings.[9] Later excavations strengthened the idea that this site is Herod's mausoleum.[10] The base of the tomb has now been uncovered and is visible to visitors to the site.

Hebrew University Professor Ehud Netzer reported on May 8, 2007 that he had discovered the tomb of Herod, above tunnels and water pools at a flattened site halfway up the hill to Herodium, 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) south of Jerusalem, at the precise location given by Josephus in his writings.[9] Later excavations strengthened the idea that this site is Herod's mausoleum.[10] The base of the tomb has now been uncovered and is visible to visitors to the site.

In 40 BCE, after the Parthian conquest of Syria, Herod fled to Masada. On the way, at the location of Herodion, Herod clashed with the Parthians and emerged victorious. According to the Roman Jewish historian Josephus, he "built a town on that spot in commemoration of his victory, and enhanced it with wonderful palaces... and he called it Herodion after himself" (The Wars of the Jews I, Chapter 13).[5]

In 40 BCE, after the Parthian conquest of Syria, Herod fled to Masada. On the way, at the location of Herodion, Herod clashed with the Parthians and emerged victorious. According to the Roman Jewish historian Josephus, he "built a town on that spot in commemoration of his victory, and enhanced it with wonderful palaces... and he called it Herodion after himself" (The Wars of the Jews I, Chapter 13).[5]

The avenue of human-headed sphinxes runs more than a mile, between the Temple of Luxor and the Temple of Karnak. A long, straight avenue like this is called a dromos. Most of this dromos remains buried under the modern city of Thebes. In this picture you can see the avenue runing beneath a Mosque in the distance.

The avenue of human-headed sphinxes runs more than a mile, between the Temple of Luxor and the Temple of Karnak. A long, straight avenue like this is called a dromos. Most of this dromos remains buried under the modern city of Thebes. In this picture you can see the avenue runing beneath a Mosque in the distance.

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