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  • Queen PoohBear

    Tea Table, Boston, ca. 1760. Mahogany and pine. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Tea prices were high, having the means to serve the beverage was considered prestigious. Every well-appointed home had a tea table in its foyer, hall, or living area waiting to serve its purpose. These tables were placed out of the way for daily use, and then moved to the middle of the room in preparation for indulgent tea parties

  • Madame Gilflurt

    Tea table about 1760 Boston, Massachusetts

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