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  • thefirstdarkblogs

    Bas-reliefs dated to about 170 B.C. reveal kentakes Shanakdakheto, dressed in armor and wielding a spear in battle. She did not rule as queen regent or queen mother but as a fully independent ruler. Her husband was her consort. In bas-reliefs found in the ruins of building projects she commissioned, Shanakdakheto is portrayed both alone as well as with her husband and son, who would inherit the throne by her death.

  • Ashley Cassidy

    Shanakdakheto or Shanakdakhete was a Black African ruling queen of Kush, when the Kingdom was centered at Meroë. She is the earliest known ruling queen of Nubia, and reigned from about 177 to 155 BC (these dates are very uncertain and disputed [1]). She styled herself as Son of Re, Lord of the Two Lands, Shanakdakheto (Sa Re nebtawy, Shanakdakheto).

  • Annie

    Shanakdakhete - African Queen of Kush. Reigned from about 177 to 155 BC (these dates are very uncertain and disputed). Meroitic hieroglyphics in her chapl show military campaigns to the south and the capture of numerous cattle and prisoners.

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Kendake was the title for queens and queen mothers of the ancient African Kingdom of Kush, also known as Nubia and Ethiopia.They were known as Nubian warrior queens, queen regents, and Ruling queen mothers. They controlled what is now Ethiopia, Sudan, and parts of Egypt. Reliefs dated to about 170 B.C. reveal kendake Shanakdakheto, dressed in armor and wielding a spear in battle. She did not rule as queen regent or queen mother but as a fully independent ruler. Her husband was her consort.

Amanitore (c. 50 CE) was a Nubian Kandake (queen) of the ancient Kushitic Kingdom of Meroë, which also is referred to as Nubia in many ancient sources. An alternate spelling is Kandace, Kandake, or Kentake. In Egyptian hieroglyphics the throne name of Amanitore reads as Merkare. Many Candaces are described as warrior queens who led forces in battle.

Berenice I (c. 340 BC-between 279-268 BC) was a Greek Macedonian noblewoman and through her marriage to Ptolemy I Soter, became the first Queen of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt.

The bracelet belonged to the Queen Amanishakheto and comes from the pyramid (Beg N. 6) in Meroe (Sudan).

The Ancient Sudan: (Society for the Promotion of the Egyptian Museum Berlin) Jewelry from the tomb of Queen Amanishakheto in Meroe

The temple of Amon (1st cent. BC/ 1st cent. AD). Sanctuary. Altar with inscription of King Natakamani and Queen Amanitore. Both are written in Meroitic hieroglyphs The figures at the top to the left is the Goddess Meret and next to her is the figure of the king

King Taharqa's Photo Gallery (25th Dynasty) Taharqa, a son and third successor of King Piye, was the greatest of the Nubian pharaohs. His empire stretched from Palestine to the confluence of the Blue and White Niles.

King Taharqa ~ son of Piye and Queen Abar. (690-664 BC)

Signet Ring: Queen seated in front of Amun : Historical Dating: Amanishakheto Sudan (country) Meroe (Location) Pyramid N6 (district) gold

The Treasures of Nubian Queen Amanishakheto. The pyramid of the queen at Wad Ban Naga. It was leveled to the ground in 1832 by European treasure hunters.