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The true orbit of the planets.

how our solar system moves through space. we are literally hurtling through space at incredible rates of speed. but we feel nothing. - So pretty

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Just some science and stuff.

I used to be OBSESSED with outer space when I was little. Wonder why i stopped

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Life And Style on Etsy

But that’s nothing compared to our sun. Just remember: | 26 Pictures Will Make You Re-Evaluate Your Entire Existence

Kepler Telescope Discovers Most Earth-Like Planet Yet: A nearly Earth-size planet orbits in a star’s habitable zone, detected by NASA astronomers. Red sunshine, seas, and maybe aliens? Scientists analyzing data from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope today report the closest thing yet to another Earth, a world in a habitable orbit around a red dwarf star some 493 light-years away. Read More | Illustration by NASA/JPL-CALTECH/T. PYLE

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The real size of the sun…

cool-planet-galaxy-size-scale-sun

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26 Pictures Will Make You Re-Evaluate Your Entire Existence

This is by far my favorite pin ever. You must look at these pics. Amazing doesn't even describe.

NASA has just published what it calls the “most amazing highest resolution image of Earth ever”, dubbed Blue Marble. click on this thing...it's huge.

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21 Pictures That Will Make You Question Your Existence

Rosetta comet compared to Los Angeles.

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All 786 known planets to scale.

All 786 planets (as of June 2012) to scale. | This is our solar system. The rest of these orbit other stars and were only discovered recently. Most of them are huge because those are the kind we learned to detect first, but now we're finding that small ones are actually more common. We know nothing about what's on any of them. With better telescopes, that would change. This is an exciting time.

The position of every known piece of space debris orbiting Earth