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On December 25, 1760 Jupiter Hammon wrote the poem "An Evening Thought: Salvation by Christ with Penitential Cries" which early the next year became the first published work by an African American. Hammon took part in Revolutionary War groups such as the Spartan Project and on September 24, 1786 delivered his "Address to the Negroes of the State of New York" saying, "If we should ever get to Heaven, we shall find nobody to reproach us for being black, or for being slaves."…

from Etsy

African American Black Man Holding Baby Daughter California Cars Early 1940s Vintage Black and White Photo Photograph

African American Black Man Holding Baby Daughter California Cars Early 1940s…

from Etsy

Old Vintage Photo of Little African American black girl - Negro - Small Child Vintage Photo Reprint

Little African American black girl

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

Moment - consequential - Consequential is something important; significant. This image is significant because its a picture of an African American from World War II. Its a part of history and serves as an evidence of the terrible chaos. This image contains balance and line as well.

vintage african american flapper photos | black history # african american # african american man # black man

Vintage Photo - African American - Black Americana couple

African American Family #black_history #african_american

from NPR.org

Black U.S. Olympians Won In Nazi Germany Only To Be Overlooked At Home

At the 1936 Olympics, 18 black athletes went to Berlin as part of the U.S. team. Pictured here are (left to right rear) Dave Albritton, and Cornelius Johnson, high jumpers; Tidye Pickett, a hurdler; Ralph Metcalfe, a sprinter; Jim Clark, a boxer, and Mack Robinson, a sprinter. In front are John Terry, (left) a weight lifter and John Brooks, a long jumper.