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The Veil Nebula, segment 2 - A portion of the Veil Nebula, left behind with the violent explosion of a massive star, shows delicate wisps of gas and dust.

The Veil Nebula, segment 2

HubbleSite: The Veil Nebula, segment 2 About This Image: A portion of the Veil Nebula, left behind with the violent explosion of a massive star, shows delicate wisps of gas and dust.

Hubble - I think this is the Sombrero galaxy.

The Sombrero Galaxy aka or NGC is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo.

Orion Nebula

A star cluster once thought to belong to the Orion Nebula is actually a separate entity, scientists say. A powerful telescope camera made the star cluster NGC 1980 find.

A dying star

A Dying Star - Six hundred and fifty light-years away in the constellation Aquarius. In death, it is spewing out massive amounts of hot gas and intense ultraviolet radiation, creating a spectacular object called a "planetary nebula.

Thor's Helmet is a nebula found in the constellation Canis Major. As seen in this recently released picture from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, the cosmic cloud of dust and gas is being shaped like a winged helm by outpourings of radiation from the massive stars inside.

Before he joins the Avengers, Thor may need to retrieve his helmet—which is floating in space light-years away. Also known as NGC Thor's Helmet is a nebula found in the constellation Canis Major.

Image result for cosmos

Image result for cosmos

Mind blown

Mind blown

It just 'accidently' makes the symbol of infinity! perfect since in symbolism, the sun symbols Christ, the moon the Church. ~ mw ~ Fixed position photograph of the sun, taken at the same time of day over a year. Looks like the infinity symbol!

"Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none." ― William Shakespeare,  All's Well That Ends Well  #quotes more on: http://quotesberry.com

Photo: In this composite image of the Crab Nebula, matter and antimatter are propelled nearly to the speed of light by the Crab pulsar. The images came from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space

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